Steeping grain efficiency

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by EvanAltman36, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. EvanAltman36

    EvanAltman36 New Member

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    I know that the default setting is for 35%, but I'm was wondering if there's any sort of "normal" range for that or if it's just going to vary by method/brewer? For instance, I have found that I regularly end up with a higher OG than what the recipe predicts, which I've counteracted by adjusting the efficiency. Usually, I'm getting around 45-50% based on the OG readings I'm getting.

    However, the last 2 readings I've taken have come via a wine thief, thus pulling from the lower, "heavier" part of the wort. I think this has given me a few extra points on the OG; not a bad thing in principle, but I don't like the idea that I might not know exactly where I'm at. And, as any good GI Joe can tell you: knowing is half the battle.

    I just brewed my Pine Tar Stout, which has some additions that aren't necessarily proven, but that I though might be fun. And isn't that the best part of brewing? This thing isn't one that adheres to style guidelines very well which is just how I like it.

    I followed a method Krimbos had recommended and went from kettle to bottling bucket, filtering with a paint strainter. I then went from there into the carboy. While I should have stirred better prior to sampling, I pulled straight from the spigot and got 1.080; then I also pulled from the carboy once full and got the same result. Both samples would have pulled from the heavy end, so I guess it's a little slanted.

    http://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/r ... -tar-stout
     
  2. LarryBrewer

    LarryBrewer Active Member

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    Regarding efficiency from steeping grains - it will vary. Depending on quality of crush, steep temp and steep time, it will go up some. 6.5 pounds of grain is practically a batch on its own!

    Sounds like a delicious beer.
     
  3. EvanAltman36

    EvanAltman36 New Member

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    Yeah, I went pretty heavy on the grain bill, so that was maybe a bit much. But what the heck, right? It smelled SO GOOD in the garage when I was steeping; I then set the bags aside in a strainer and continued to let the remaining water seep out, which I intermittently added to the boil. Got almost like syrup by the end.
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Dude, a little base malt in those steeping grains and you're up to partial mash! I'm wondering about the 0.25# candi sugar - seems like that will get lost in the wort and that little won't do much for body. But it looks like a very interesting beer - keep us posted.
     
  5. EvanAltman36

    EvanAltman36 New Member

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    If I'm being honest, I really don't even remember why I had the candi sugar in there; maybe because I knew I had a little left when I was putting the recipe together. I mean, I had exactly 4oz left, so that's what I went with. Admittedly, it'll be lost amidst all the other stuff. But I'll post on results once it's kegged and drinkable, probably as it comes along too.
     

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