Roasting Rye Malt to a Chocolate Rye

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by OkanaganMike, Mar 28, 2017.

  1. OkanaganMike

    OkanaganMike Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2016
    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    64
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Can't seem to find any choc rye locally and was thinking of toasting my own. I did a wheat to a cara wheat a few months ago and wonder if anyone has any idea on time/temp to turn rye to a choc rye malt or if its even possible?
     
  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,472
    Likes Received:
    9,556
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Chocolate malt is well roasted eh? I'd say you'd need to give it some time in the oven bbq whatever your using but if your turning it every 10-15 minutes in the pan you should be able to tell when the colour looks right but break the kernels open as well to be sure to be sure.:D
     
  3. CRUNK

    CRUNK Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2017
    Messages:
    899
    Likes Received:
    550
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    I have never done it myself, sorry I'm not help here
     
  4. OkanaganMike

    OkanaganMike Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2016
    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    64
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Yeah, was thinking I could just wing it but was hoping for something like a hard time and temp thing.
     
  5. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,472
    Likes Received:
    9,556
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Shell be right mate as the Aussie saying goes. From roasting my own malt it brought some great attributes to the beers ive used em in. So ill say if you dont nail the chocolate malt 100% near enough should be good enough im sure.;)
     
  6. OkanaganMike

    OkanaganMike Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2016
    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    64
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Close enough is my middle name. Hehehe
     
  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,438
    Likes Received:
    6,699
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    Just be careful not to catch it on fire - it takes a lot of heat to get really dark malts! In fact, keep a sprayer handy to cool it down as soon as you get to the degree of darkness you want.
     
  8. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,977
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    I personally wouldn't try anything dark, all Ive gotten was a roasted or burnt type of flavor, it requires the correct moisture and temperature to get it right, what I did was moisten the grain then add to a turkey oven with the lid propped up with dowels and set the heat very low, the inside of the grain is the target not the outside by the way
     
  9. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,472
    Likes Received:
    9,556
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    I know the darker you go the more acrid bitterness you get so will do well to rest the grain for a week or two before use too.
     
  10. OkanaganMike

    OkanaganMike Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2016
    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    64
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Yeah thanks guys. The more I think about it the more I'm tempted not to try it. Getting to that darkness does worry me about levels of astringency and possibly ruining the batch.
     
  11. CRUNK

    CRUNK Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2017
    Messages:
    899
    Likes Received:
    550
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Call it research, it's just grain
     
  12. OkanaganMike

    OkanaganMike Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2016
    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    64
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Agreed. It just pains me to dump beer I don't like :(
     
  13. KC

    KC Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2015
    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    179
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    NY Capital
    Most of that roasted astringency comes from burning the barley husk. Rye doesn't have a husk so your risk of that should be pretty low.

    220-230°C for 2-2.5 hours:
    https://byo.com/mead/item/456-chocolate-malt

    If you can sacrifice a small amount of malt you can do a test roast. Pull an ounce or so every few minutes and label. Make tea from each of the samples. Whichever one you like best, use that time to roast the full batch.
     
    Trialben likes this.
  14. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,472
    Likes Received:
    9,556
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Yea where's your pioneering spirit the Okanagan mike i thought you had this mate :D I second what KC said after your roast steep test some in a jar and have a taste it should reflect the flavour of your roasted malt.

    Check out that roast your own site I flicked up in that other thread that guy was on the money with his roasting techniques.
     
  15. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,472
    Likes Received:
    9,556
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Well how'd you go Mikey you get some chocolate rye going? Or just bought some from the brew store? Just wondering how you got on its a fair effort roasting your own grains but I think it adds another personal dimension to the beer:).
     

Share This Page

arrow_white