Reusing Washed Yeast

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Tal Orbach, Jul 18, 2018.

  1. Tal Orbach

    Tal Orbach Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2018
    Messages:
    151
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Hi.
    A couple of days ago I bottled my second batch. I harvested and washed the yeast.
    I just finished brewing the wart for my next batch, and I want to reuse the harvested yeast.
    Thing is - I'm not sure how to do it.
    There are layers in both jars of harvested yeast - one jar seems to have 3 layers, and the other seems to have four (see attached picture). Should I use all of it or only some of the layers? If some - which ones?
    Do I need to make a starter, or can I just use them as is (seeing as they were harvested only two days ago)
    Don't know if relevant, but they were in the fermenter for 18 days, they are Nottingham yeast, and the fermentation was done any 17C.

    Thanks!

    Tal
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,976
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    the yeast is always the top layer and or the whitest
     
  3. Tal Orbach

    Tal Orbach Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2018
    Messages:
    151
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    18
    So do I pour out the beer (most of the stuff filling the far), and only pour this thin, white layer into the new wort?
    What about the need for a starter? Do I need it or can I just put it in there?
     
  4. KC

    KC Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2015
    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    179
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    NY Capital
    The starter isn't mandatory but helps ensure a healthy pitch, and works a lot better if you're brewing more than 2 gallons.

    Here's a trick to take the yeast off the trub: pour out the excess beer from on top, mix the remaining sediment with fresh water into a smaller jar, let that sit at room temperature. When the non-yeast layers settle out (B3 is hops, A4 is break) the yeast is still in suspension. Pour that off and you have your (diluted) yeast. That's usable as-is or you can thicken the slurry by letting that settle out again and concentrating it in an even smaller jar.
     
    CRUNK likes this.
  5. Tal Orbach

    Tal Orbach Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2018
    Messages:
    151
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Thanks for the detailed explanation, and for referencing my numbering - really helps me to understand things!
     
  6. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2017
    Messages:
    3,724
    Likes Received:
    2,963
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Manager
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Yeah really you could just pour off most of the beer on top and then swirl it to dump it in. Won't hurt anything. But if you make a starter you can put some of it back in the jar for next time directly and not worry about washing it.
     
    Fitz5, Trialben and Tal Orbach like this.
  7. Tal Orbach

    Tal Orbach Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2018
    Messages:
    151
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I already pitched it into both of my worts. They seem to form a very nice krausen. :)
     
    Hawkbox and Trialben like this.

Share This Page

arrow_white