Reducing bicarbonate from tap water in yeast starter

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Starter Hops, Mar 31, 2017.

  1. Starter Hops

    Starter Hops Member

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    I typically pitch in a yeast starter while its at high kraussen. I don't chill and decant. My question, how should I attempt to reduce the bicarbonate in my tap water, in the starter itself? Does anyone acidify starter water with 10% phosphoric acid proportional to the size of the starter? Or do you boil the tap water, cool it (how long?) and then add yeast in the flask?
     
  2. CRUNK

    CRUNK Well-Known Member

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    I boil it for 5 to 10 minutes, then I add dme then chill it to pitching temperatures then pitch the yeast into the flask.
     
  3. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    I've actually thought about adding some calcium chloride to my starters to give me yeast some added nutrients. I don't add yeast nutrient but I'm guessing thAt would be tops. I boil my starter in flask with the DME 10 mins cool and pitch per usual.
     
  4. Starter Hops

    Starter Hops Member

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    Good answers. Thanks guys.

    Cheers!
     
  5. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    I use distilled water for my starters but then add a heaping spoon of yeast nutrient, its always worked out fine, also I did just use filtered water then add just a pinch of my campden tablet to dechlorinate
     
  6. Mase

    Mase Well-Known Member

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    I've been using "Fast Pitch" yeast starter. They're organic and simple. We pitch our yeast in the starter on Friday evenings for Sunday Brew days. You do have to add an equal amount of water for a 1 Liter starter, but I use bottle spring water and Star San spray the lid of the water bottle before opening, and around the bottle top after opening. And I do not use a stirring plate. Instead we keep the Erlenmeyer flask of starter in the kitchen and cover the flask with Star San sprayed aluminum foil and then cover the flask with a dark towel so that when we walk by, we give it a swirl.
     
  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Calcium chloride is not a yeast nutrient. Use something with nitrogen, like DAP or a biologically based nutrient like Fermaid instead.
     
  8. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

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    I have been told adding some yeast slurry to my boil for starters will contain all the nutrients that yeast need
    Zinc , calcium and magnesium will already be in my tap water and not rehydrate in distilled or RO water
    Same can be done for the full batch , bakers yeast is cheap
     
  9. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Getting to know you yeast your working with is a great tool too to gauge weather something may be up with them for instance a poor attenuation or extended poor floculation from a highly floculate yeast. If my yeast start stalling before 80% attenuation for example in my Chico yeast department I'll purchase some new yeast.

    I'm looking forward to getting to know the flavour, floculation and attenuation of my new yeasties from coopers brewery:)
     

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