Redneck Cream Ale

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Mattacox, May 16, 2016.

  1. Mattacox

    Mattacox New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Durham, NC
    So, summer means time for lawnmower beer. Inspired by some pre-Prohibition goodness, I've just brewed this. A three-hour brew session concluded with a pitch of 1056 into the 5.5ish gallons in the fermentor. I'm tempted to let the mash sour a bit tonight and tomorrow, and brew what comes off of it with some high-alpha American hops.

    Title: Redneck Cream Ale

    Brew Method: All Grain
    Style Name: Light American Lager
    Boil Time: 60 min
    Batch Size: 5 gallons (fermentor volume)
    Boil Size: 6 gallons
    Boil Gravity: 1.048
    Efficiency: 75% (brew house)


    STATS:
    Original Gravity: 1.057
    Final Gravity: 1.014
    ABV (standard): 5.65%
    IBU (tinseth): 37.14
    SRM (morey): 4.12

    FERMENTABLES:
    5.1 lb - American - Pale 6-Row (48.8%)
    3.1 lb - American - Pale 2-Row (29.7%)
    2 lb - Flaked Corn (19.1%)
    0.25 lb - German - Melanoidin (2.4%)

    HOPS:
    1 oz - Cluster, Type: Pellet, AA: 6.5, Use: Boil for 55 min, IBU: 24.64
    1 oz - Cluster, Type: Pellet, AA: 6.5, Use: Boil for 15 min, IBU: 12.5

    YEAST:
    Wyeast - American Ale 1056
    Starter: Yes
    Form: Liquid
    Attenuation (avg): 75%
    Flocculation: Med-Low
    Optimum Temp: 60 - 72 F
    Fermentation Temp: 75 F
    Pitch Rate: 1.0 (M cells / ml / deg P)

    TARGET WATER PROFILE:
    Profile Name: Durham, NC 2013
    Ca2: 6
    Mg2: 2
    Na: 31
    Cl: 10
    SO4: 48
    HCO3: 32
    Water Notes:
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,977
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    that 2 pounds of flaked corn will be very pronounced, I know thats what they used back then but I personally don't like the corn taste in beer, rice is a good substitute thats flavorless, you could use both and knock down that flavor some 1 pound of each but hey its your beer just a thought :D
     
    BrewerRick likes this.
  3. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rosedale, MD
    i think a little sour twang would make it quite refreshing on a summers day
     
  4. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2014
    Messages:
    528
    Likes Received:
    264
    Trophy Points:
    63
    looks good, but why use both 2 row and 6 row?

    and if you let the mash sour and run off, I'd think you would have to add a bit more grain to it, since you've already run it off once. otherwise the second soured run off wouldn't have much sugar in it. I think that might fit into sort of a kentucky common type brew though, and a touch of sour would be thirst quenching.
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,418
    Likes Received:
    6,670
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    Agree with Hogarthe: You're pretty dang close to a Kentucky Common, a style I absolutely love (as a true Kentuckian should). For my common, I've done away with the sugar, I use even more corn, some rye, no Melanoidin, some crystal and chocolate, cream ale yeast and some molasses. Recipe is here:

    http://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/r ... common-5-1

    Please note that at the time Ky. Common existed, Louisville was the sixth largest city in the country. Their brewing and delivery practices were state of the art and any souring happened in trade, not in the brewery. I've tried souring it several ways and don't come up with a beer to compare to the one above, unsoured. Also, the beer was as you say, a redneck cream ale (before there were rednecks). It was the poor man's beer, ideal for a hot Northern Kentucky summer day and quite quaffable. The Cluster/Saaz hop combination really brings out the blackcurrant/blueberry flavor of the hops and the Cream Ale yeast gives the beer a lagery character.
     
  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,418
    Likes Received:
    6,670
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    I also agree with Hogarthe on using six-row, in fact, I'll likely go with 100% six-row and a protein rest next brew of this beer.
     
  7. Mattacox

    Mattacox New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Durham, NC
    I'm hoping the melanoidin will do that for me...
     
  8. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,418
    Likes Received:
    6,670
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    Melanoidin provides malty sweetness. Use a large dose of acidulated malt or food-grade lactic acid at bottling to get the "twang." The latter is more predictable.
     
  9. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rosedale, MD
    Nosy, I brewed a slightly tweaked recipe of your Sourdough Blonde this weekend. Little bit of acidulated malt and used organic greek yogurt instead of tossing in some crushed grain like i normally do. It was also weird to sour the wort rather than the mash, but it made the brew day go much quicker the following day.

    anyway, my point is that this sourness seemed to smell a bit different than the other 2 or 3 that I've brewed. a bit restrained maybe, but not in a bad way. that may be an option for you to think about
     
  10. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,418
    Likes Received:
    6,670
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    I think that's the "lack of complexity" the souring purists complain about with kettle souring. I personally don't mind. Most of what the "purists" call funk I call dirty sweatsocks. The purpose of this brew was to establish a baseline beer for layering fruits over. It already comes out with strong tropical fruit flavors - I get pineapple and mango - so layering strawberries or peaches or some other fruit over it should result in a very nicely flavored, slightly tart beer. But I like drinking it straight so that layering might wait for a brew or two - I want to try it again and get the pH down to 3.5 before boiling.

    The original idea was soured with locally produced organic yogurt and it came out slightly different, but still close enough to tell they were the same beers. One side effect of using sourdough is starch haze but it's kind of a neat way of coming to a name, right?
     
  11. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rosedale, MD
    Exactly, horse blanket and barnyard are not desirable descriptors of beer IMO. Much prefer a clean sour.

    And I always like adding another thing to my "I can brew with that" list
     
  12. Mattacox

    Mattacox New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Durham, NC
    This came out of primary yesterday. First blush:

    It's got a great American beer taste- the corn is there, but not overwhelming. Hops additions where planned well- they aren't absent, but very subtle, in the background. The mouthfeel isn't as watery as a Genny Cream or somesuch, and the alcohol is low, maybe 4% or so (yeah, I broke my hydrometer, so I don't have a good reading on this). Color is a pale straw, and it's super-clear already. The 1056 ate flocced out pretty thoroughly.

    I chilled it out, added some gelatin to the keg, and cranked up the pressure to get it up to about 2.5 volumes. This is going to be a very sessionable lawnmower beer.
     
  13. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,418
    Likes Received:
    6,670
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    My Ky Common comes into balance at about 40 days into the process. All the excess esters oxidize and it becomes a slightly bitter-balanced, more malty cream ale. Give it some time - it may improve!
     
  14. Mattacox

    Mattacox New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Durham, NC
    With the carb dead-on, this is a fantastic-drinking pale ale. Not really hoppy, corn-forward :) I'll put this in the regular annual rotation.
     
  15. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2015
    Messages:
    3,240
    Likes Received:
    1,557
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Annual rotation? Wow! My definition of rotation means I always want to have some on hand! How many of those do you have?
     
  16. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,450
    Likes Received:
    9,525
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Any ideas upon the perfect water profile for a cream ale I'm looking forward to brewing stikks vanilla cream ale and his water profile is spring water or RO water. I'm gathering pilsner style water profile ?. As little salts a possible? I was looking At the Brewers Friend light and Hoppy profile is that a good water profile to aim for this beer style?
     
  17. Mattacox

    Mattacox New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Durham, NC
    I tend to brew a ten-gallon batch of something seasonally. For instance, every spring there's a Belgian Witbier (that I sometimes split in primary and throw springtime berries at it), every fall there's an amber lager, etc. This cream ale was session-y and light enough to be a perfect summertime table/lawnmower beer.
     
  18. Mattacox

    Mattacox New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Durham, NC
    How many bottles, or how many beers do we brew seasonally?
     
  19. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2015
    Messages:
    3,240
    Likes Received:
    1,557
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I think I meant batches/recipes with that question.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white