Recipe help....

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Zambezi Special, Jul 3, 2019.

  1. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    I think I more or less got all my stuff together, so now it is time to start a (small) batch.
    I will be doing BIAB and I am thinking of boiling all together (no sparge).
    I'm trying to get my head around brewtarget, but not sure if I am doing/using it totally correct, so I would like to check with all of you.
    Also, the malt I have is not in their list so I gambled a bit with what I thought was the closest to it....
    The type of beer is supposed to be Belgian blonde, although a little lighter in alcohol.
    All equipment is new (to me), so I will need to do a lot of measurements etc to fine tune for the next batch

    Fermentables:
    Walt's lager malt - 0.4 kg
    Walt's pilsner malt - 2.0 kg

    Hop:
    Hallertau 9.1% 10 gram - 1 hour
    Saaz 2.4% - 5 gram - 10 min
    Saaz 2.4% - 5 gram - 1 min

    Yeast
    Mangrove Jack Belgian ale M41

    One step mash at 67 oC

    Heat 16 liter water to a bit above 67 oC
    Add finely milled grains and agitate
    Insulate and leave for 1 hour

    Heat to 77 oC and pull out BIAB bag and drain as much liquid as possible
    Bring to boil and keep at rolling boil for an hour
    Add hops at required timings

    Cool as quick as possible and move to fermenter
    Once wort temp is below 28 oC yeast can be added
    Move to fermentation fridge set to around 22 oC

    I should end up with about 10 liter?
    Expected OG - 1052
    Expected FG - 1013
    Alcohol % - 5.2 %
    IBU - 23.9

    Does this make some form of sense?
    Or am I missing something? or complicating or over simplifying?
     
  2. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    For your mash, you want to yield a temperature of ~67 C, so you'll need to heat your strike water a little bit hotter. 3 C should do it.
    I wouldn't pitch my yeast until I was at about 19 C and then hold there for a week or so.
    The yield will depend on your boil off rate, so having a way to measure your finished volume in your pot will be helpful. You can always boil a little longer to reduce, or add cold bottled water to the finished wort if you're low.
    Good luck,
    Brian
     
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  3. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

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    I use BIAB for 10L batches on a regular basis, similar to what you are doing. If you want to up the yield just a bit, you can have a bucket (about 2 liters) of hot water (150 °C) on hand when you pull your grain bag out of the mash. I drop the grain bag into the bucket and rinse the residual sugars out and pout this into the wort, a sort of modified batch sparge. Of course, you'll need to reduce your initial water by the same amount.
     
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  4. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Looks like a lager recipie too me no Belgian blonde or are both just two and the same just different yeast. .?
     
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  5. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    Thanks all!

    @The Brew Mentor :
    Thanks for the extra info.
    Is 67 oC a good temperature for a one step mash? I figured it will cool down slightly in an hour's time, so it can go through all stages.
    Why would you only pitch the yeast at 19 oC? The specs for the yeast state a temperature range of 18 - 28 oC? I figured that the sooner the yeast is added, the less the chance of infections?

    @Bubba Wade :
    Good idea! I just think you mean 150 oF water?
    That would be quite an easy way to up the efficiency somewhat (much less messy than sparging)

    @Trialben :
    I based the recipe on a recipe for a blond beer.
    Maybe it's the yeast and fermentation temperature that make the real difference?
     
  6. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

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    Yes, 150 C would be a bit warm for this, since it would be steam.
     
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  7. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    #7 Zambezi Special, Jul 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
    We had some power cuts, so haven't started yet.
    Still wondering about the temperature at which to pitch the yeast?
    Is pitching at 28 oC and then slowly cooling the lot down to about 24 oC really a bad idea?
     
  8. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Probably best to pitch below at least 20c unless a heat tolerant yeast strain you know can ferment clean at elevated ferment temps and won't spit out a heap of yukky esters and phenols due to stresses working environment.

    Most my fermentation schedules work the opposite they start low and ramp up towards end of fermentation.

    The start of the fermentation cycle is when most off flavours are purportedly produced from yeast once through this critical stage it's ok to let the temperature rise some but best not drop in temp because this will cause yeast to flock early on you and leave you with a sweet underattenuated and potentially hazy beer.

    Is it worth cooling your wort more before pitching i recon it is.
     
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  9. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    @Trialben : That makes it very clear. Thanks
     
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