question about malt extract

BeerGeekCa

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Hello,

A newb question about malt extracts.

Since I am a beginner, I am using ready-made kits (e.g. coopers), which call for about 1 kg of sugar to be added.
I read that replacing the add-on sugars with dry or liquid malt extract creates a better flavor.
But isn't the kit already made up of liquid malt with some hops?

What is the difference between the malt extract in the kit and the malt add-ons that I buy?

If they are the same, do I even need the kit, or should I just buy liquid malt extract and use that ?
 
Hello,

A newb question about malt extracts.

Since I am a beginner, I am using ready-made kits (e.g. coopers), which call for about 1 kg of sugar to be added.
I read that replacing the add-on sugars with dry or liquid malt extract creates a better flavor.
But isn't the kit already made up of liquid malt with some hops?

What is the difference between the malt extract in the kit and the malt add-ons that I buy?

If they are the same, do I even need the kit, or should I just buy liquid malt extract and use that ?
If the malt extract that the kit has is already hopped, then the extra LME/DME that you would add, would add more malt and more gravity, certainly giving a different flavour than just sugar. BUT, it wont add any more hops. Do the kits have hops to be boiled or is it only hopped malt?

Table sugar would only add more gravity resulting in more alcohol. Personally would avoid a kit that suggests using sugar to finish it. seems like they are just cheaping out on the LME/DME, which cots more.

honestly though, consider going into all grain. there is not really much more complexity to it and you have control over the process. only thing you have to buy is a brew bag. can make it all in the same kettle you boil in now. :cool:
 
The kits are hooped, I attached a picture of the ingredients.
So instead of buying a kit, I can just buy LME and add hops (how do I add hops to LME, cook it together ?) ?


Going all grain is definitely the plan for the future, but since I am just starting out, I am trying to simplify things until I figure out all equipment and process.

Does cooking grain basically gives you LME?
 

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The kits are hooped, I attached a picture of the ingredients.
So instead of buying a kit, I can just buy LME and add hops (how do I add hops to LME, cook it together ?) ?

yes you can. you just have to add enough to get your gravity where you need it. As with any unhopped DME/LME boil or with full grain, you boil the hops with the wort.
Going all grain is definitely the plan for the future, but since I am just starting out, I am trying to simplify things until I figure out all equipment and process.

Does cooking grain basically gives you LME?

sounds like a plan. ya, kinda. they mash it and then boil it to reduce it, then dehydrate it into liquid or powder. the downside is that your beer is only ever gonna be as good as the people that did the hard work. ;)
 
I started with a couple of kits but as @Minbari states, you don't have a lot of control on the creative part of brewing. You get some really decent beers from kits and if you are short on time, they are ideal. All grain, for me, has allowed me to be a "mad scientist" with brewing. All so much fun. I would also stay away from kits the direct you to add sugar in the basic brewing instructions. My 2 cents.
 
I started with an all grain biab kit.
And although it all went clumsy enough, it turned into beer
All this, just to say, don't fear all grain.

But you can make good beer with DME ir LME. Hopefully @Craigerrr will pull in (as I got no experience with it)
 
The kits are hooped, I attached a picture of the ingredients.
So instead of buying a kit, I can just buy LME and add hops (how do I add hops to LME, cook it together ?) ?


Going all grain is definitely the plan for the future, but since I am just starting out, I am trying to simplify things until I figure out all equipment and process.

Does cooking grain basically gives you LME?
I did the just LME cans for one or two brews a long time ago I did some brown ale malt then hopped it with I believe Galaxy lol oh and threw a can of condensed milk in for good measure it worked BTW.
I used to throw all sorts of crap in my beer back then.

I remember throwing red liquorice in one brew :p
It had a red tinge to it guy at the HB store thought I was nuts.

Haven't come far since either ...
 
Hello,

A newb question about malt extracts.

Since I am a beginner, I am using ready-made kits (e.g. coopers), which call for about 1 kg of sugar to be added.
I read that replacing the add-on sugars with dry or liquid malt extract creates a better flavor.
But isn't the kit already made up of liquid malt with some hops?

What is the difference between the malt extract in the kit and the malt add-ons that I buy?

If they are the same, do I even need the kit, or should I just buy liquid malt extract and use that ?
The Can kits that you're starting with are already hopped and ready to go. Just add water, sugar and yeast and they'll make beer. Not good beer, but beer nonetheless.
Adding malt extract to them instead of sugar will give you different and maybe better results depending on the extract used. All malt extracts are not the same and liquid malt extract can change and degrade pretty quickly. Dry malt extract is a better option.
Plenty of people have gotten into this hobby exactly how you're starting. The Mr. Beer kit and setup is exactly that and was a very popular starting setup.
Some simple changes to what you're doing can yield much better result.
Depending on what's available to you, an extract with steeping grains kit and setup will get you more into the total brewing process and net better results.
You can also go to a partial mash without much additional effort, time and equipment as well.
Jumping into all grain is an option as well, but I prefer to guide new brewer's into something that will give good results with less initial effort and time to make sure they like what they're doing and the results.
You will need some equipment and access to fresh ingredients. I strongly suggest a local home brew shop to get setup for what you decide.
Just to give you some ideas as to the brew day times, here's a rough list of what to expect.
Can kit with sugar...15-30 minutes
Extract with steeping grains... 3-4 hours
Partial mash with extract... 4-5 hours
All grain... 5-7 hours.
Good luck, ask questions and RDWHAHB!
Brian
 
I would start by doing two things:
1. Spend $20 or so and buy John Palmer's "How to Brew" book.
2. See if you have a local HB store as they are a big help getting started.
I remember the old Mr. Beer days - dump some syrup in a pot not knowing what the hell I was doing and getting some fairly shitty beer, but it was beer.
It got better with the steeping grains and a little knowledge with some HB store people, but extracts. at least for me, never fermented down below 1.020 no matter what I did.
As you are buying equipment for an extract, make sure the most expensive items (like the kettle) will work for full volume. My 10 gallon kettle would not work for my 5 gallon BIAB, so I had to buy a 15 gallon.
BIAB takes about the same amount of time as extract with steeping grains and the beer is SIGNIFICANTLY better.
If this doesn't help, reread #1. His book explains things very well for beginners.
 
Sandy's post made me think:
Where are you located?
Do you like dealing with imperial measurements or metric?
IF metric, there is quite a nice little booklet I bought recently for kindle:
Brew better beer by Emma Christensen
 
Thank you all, this is very helpful. I now understand how the malt is used in each type of process.
I did some more reading on all grain and partial mash, and if the beer tastes better, its worth the effort for sure.
I will probably finish running the 2 kits that I currently have and then try to use some fresh grains.

No HB stores near me :) , except for one, and they tell me to go read online when I ask questions :)
So ill need to buy grain, hops and yeast online. Any recommendations for a complete beginner recipes that use widely available grain,hop and yeast ingredients ?
 
Any recommendations for a complete beginner recipes that use widely available grain,hop and yeast ingredients ?
Let us know what type of beer you like.
Just don't start off with a lager.
Leave that for later.
And do you have a place somewhere with a steady temperature? And what temp?
 
Thank you all, this is very helpful. I now understand how the malt is used in each type of process.
I did some more reading on all grain and partial mash, and if the beer tastes better, its worth the effort for sure.
I will probably finish running the 2 kits that I currently have and then try to use some fresh grains.

No HB stores near me :) , except for one, and they tell me to go read online when I ask questions :)
So ill need to buy grain, hops and yeast online. Any recommendations for a complete beginner recipes that use widely available grain,hop and yeast ingredients ?
The HB store near you does not have grain, hops and yeast? Never heard of that.
Most HB stores will crush the grain as well.
Very easy starter recipe for 5 gallons is a single hop Pale Ale. 95 or so % Pale Malt and about 1/2 pound Crystal 40. S-05 Yeast, Cascade Hops. If you don't like hoppy beers, dial the hops down and call it a Blonde.
Use the online calculator on this site to set-up an equipment profile. If you don't like the one on this site, BeerSmith works too.
 
Sandy's post made me think:
Where are you located?
Do you like dealing with imperial measurements or metric?
IF metric, there is quite a nice little booklet I bought recently for kindle:
Brew better beer by Emma Christensen
Correction: that booklet is imperial. Not metic. Sorry
 
See if you can get Blackrock, made by Speights in Dunedin. I'm guessing you are in this part of the world if you are using Coopers kits.

They have some terrific recipes and regularly win competitions with partial mash brews.
 
Or Coopers green cans Aka Coopers Lager of the extract brewers I talk to nearly all say Cooper Lager is their favourite.
 
I am located near Toronto Canada , so metric or imperial are fine .
Average temperature in my working area is 20c.
Most HB stores in my area closed , nearest brick and mortar one is 1.5 hour away . rest are online.
I like hoppy bitter beers , wife and son like sweeter beers , sweet ipa , and cider.
When you say "95 or so % Pale Malt " 95% of what ? is it 95% of 15lb grain ?
Although the kits call for 23 litter , I usually ferment in a corney keg which is 5G(19L), what size of kettle would i need in for that size of BIAB batch ?
 
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