Priming 500ml bottles

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Joiner8, Feb 17, 2021.

  1. Joiner8

    Joiner8 New Member

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    How may grams of sugar do i add to a 500ml flip top bottle for ipa
     
  2. Frankenbrewer

    Frankenbrewer Well-Known Member

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    The amount of sugar to be added depends on batch size and the level of carbonation you want. Be careful though of adding too much sugar unless you are using Belgian Ale bottles which are a bit thicker than regular beer bottles. Having said all of that, for a 5 gal batch of an IPA, 3 - 3.5 ounces mixed in with the beer before bottling. I haven't bottled in some time but I'm sure others will chime in.
     
  3. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    https://www.brewersfriend.com/beer-priming-calculator/

    The thing I’d be cautious of is if you’re adding sugar without dissolving it, the residual co2 in the beer may volcano up on you when you add the sugar (lots of nucleation points).
    Most people will prime the whole batch in a bottling bucket and then rack the beer into the bottles then. But it depends on the size of your batch- for a small batch it’s probably easier to prime each bottle individually.
     
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  4. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    I use PET bottles, so am not too worried about the pressure.
    I put 3/8 teaspoon sugar per bottle.
    I use the 1/8 measuring spoon from a set. But when I didn't have those (still in a box somewhere) I used about half a teaspoon (eye balled).
    But as mentioned above: it depends on the bottle.
    The green Grolsch fliptop is not nearly as strong as the brown Grolsch (deposit) fliptop!
     
  5. Joiner8

    Joiner8 New Member

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    Its bulldog evil dog double ipa turned out 8.4 abv so its really strong
     
  6. Josh Hughes

    Josh Hughes Well-Known Member

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    I add 1/2 tsp per bottle. Using a bottle filler I haven’t had a volcano, yet. Make sure Everything is sanitized though. With small batches racking from the fermenter I find it easier. I used to use the calculator to good results but when with this method since I had some consistency issues.
     
  7. Joiner8

    Joiner8 New Member

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    I used 1x 3 gram carbonation in each 500ml flip top bottle
     
  8. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I once calculated it out to about 3 grams, or about a sugar cube.
     
  9. okoncentrerad

    okoncentrerad Active Member

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    I suggest carbonation drops or something like this
     
  10. sbaclimber

    sbaclimber Well-Known Member

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    As others have mentioned, adding (dissolved) sugar to the bottling bucket is the easiest way to go!
    That way, it "doesn't matter" what sized container you are filling. :D
     
  11. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Yep.
     
  12. Herm_brews

    Herm_brews Well-Known Member

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    I use the Priming Calculator on Brewers Friend, which gives levels of carbonation based on style. It is easy enough to input the current temperature of the beer (at bottling time), the approximate (or actual measured) volume, and the target level of carbonation, then the calculator states an amount to use for any of several priming sugar options. I mix my appropriate amount of sugar in with ~12 ounces of water, boil for a few minutes, then allow the solution to cool. This priming solution is poured into a cleaned and sanitized bottling bucket, the finished beer is racked in and thoroughly mixed, then transferred to bottles using a spring loaded bottling wand. I have experienced success with this method every time I have brewed. In fact, I will be bottling an amber ale today.
     
  13. The Green Man

    The Green Man Well-Known Member

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    I do pretty much what @Herm_brews does except mine goes into the primary. Then, I give it a gentle stir, let any yeast settle for 10 mins and away you go. One less vessel to wash up and no fiddling around with putting sugar in bottles. I have been very happy with my beers.
    Each to their own though. You will find the way that suits you. Go forth and experiment!
     
  14. Herm_brews

    Herm_brews Well-Known Member

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    @The Green Man I might give your method a try, as that eliminates another vessel to clean and sanitize. Your method also seems to minimize exposure to the air. Good idea.
     
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  15. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    I think I will try this next batch that I bottle a batch, connect a bottling wand to the spigot on my Speidel fermenter. I want to bottle a NEIPA one time, will do this, and have an assistant purge the bottles with Co2 as U go...
     
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  16. Silver_Is_Money

    Silver_Is_Money Active Member

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    #16 Silver_Is_Money, Mar 7, 2021
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2021
    Does this (I.E., the @The Green Man priming method) lead to massive yeast cakes in each bottle, and cloudy pours? If not, I'm game to give it a try.

    In direct answer to the OP, if I was going to simplify it down to a single specific weight of table sugar per 500 mL bottle, I would go with 3.2 grams. Finding, or making, a scoop that levels off to this nominal weight of table sugar delivery would be prudent. Cutting or filing down a tiny plastic scoop until it delivers 3.2 grams when leveled off would be one means to this end.
     
  17. The Green Man

    The Green Man Well-Known Member

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    I haven't found either big yeast cakes or cloudy pours. Obviously, it's a gentle stir rather than vigorous one to avoid oxygenation and also disturbing the yeast.
    10 mins seems to be enough for any disturbed yeast to settle.
    Each to their own though. I just find it easier and saves time. I'm sure you'd get better consistency with the measured sugar per bottle method, but I am just not that bothered and haven't had any flat beer in any case.
    That's what I love about brewing your own beer. You can literally customise everything from ingredients to methods and everything inbetween.
     
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  18. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Regarding the exact amount per bottle, or for that matter per batch, IMHO that one size does not fit all. Beer temperature is a variable to be considered as well as desired carbonation level. It is always wise to use the calculator.
     
  19. The Green Man

    The Green Man Well-Known Member

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    The priming calculator in the recipe builder is really useful for the batch method. Per bottle might need a bit of working out, but I wouldn't be surprised if there is something for that on this site.
    The one in the recipe builder seems to give you a carbonation level relevant for the style. All you need to do is choose your poison. As for me, it is always table sugar.
     
  20. Ward Chillington

    Ward Chillington Well-Known Member

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    +1 to that!

    Let me ask this question, why are you priming this way?

    I'm assuming there is an underlying reason for your question and apologies if I missed that but I'm assuming you have a time or a hardware problem that you are trying to overcome by priming your bottles this way. Keep in mind that while you may be cutting out time and effort but you are also opening a vector for other potential problems further down the line that can lead to everything from an inconsistent outcome to bigger bottle bombs to contamination!

    If I could offer a different perspective on this; you have come this far in brewing what you hope is a beer you will be proud of so cutting corners at this stage of the game, you stand to loose what you have been working so hard at!

    Boiling your sugars and creating a homogenous mixture does 2 things towards ensuring a quality outcome. Your priming liquid is sterile so you are not risking any contaminates entering your bottle while you scoop and pour over and over and get a small but different amount of sugars into each bottle or spreading an unwanted bug between your sugar, the spoon you are scooping and measuring it with and probably a funnel to get the sugar into the bottles.

    I'm a 12 oz and 22 oz bottler and I've had only one bottle bomb knock on wood. Actually, keeping with the analogy, I guess I should say they "Blow". 12 ounces of beer is enough to clean up and not the way that I prefer to make it disappear! Using a half liter bottle is also potentially making a bigger bottle bomb. Keep that in mind that while you are scaling up your yield.

    This is more than an answer you were looking for I'm sure but take it from a self proclaimed cheap bastard. If it's time or effort that you are trying to cut the corners on; I don't think this one is worth it.

    Welcome the forum and I hope to see you back here and I would enjoy understanding why you want to use this method.
     
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