Porter recipe

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by EvanAltman36, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. EvanAltman36

    EvanAltman36 New Member

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    Okay, I might have shared this before too, but now I'm finally getting around to brewing it in the next week or so. Given the results I've been getting with steeping grain efficiency, I actually dialed down the extract a little from the initial recipe. I'm pretty excited about this one; a little background: as a Cubs fan (insert bad jokes here), I decided to create a character named Cubby Claus who visits each Christmas Eve and brings Cubs gifts to my kids with Santa. We have always left milk for Santa and beer for Cubby; now that I'm brewing, I thought it only fitting that the man should have his own signature brew to enjoy. I've heard differing results on the addition of maple syrup, so I'd appreciate feedback. Thanks!

    http://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/r ... mas-porter
     
  2. LarryBrewer

    LarryBrewer Active Member

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    Its cool that you are giving Mr.Claus 4oz of Burbon!

    Should be a tasty brew.
     
  3. EvanAltman36

    EvanAltman36 New Member

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    I might actually up the bourbon quantity, if only to get a more bourbon-y flavor. The Crown Maple Finished bourbon is nice, but a little too much carmel and not enough of the typical bourbon flavor I would like to have. Probably not much, but enough to bring it out a bit. Of course, I can always put some of the oaked-infused maple into a separate container and sub in some regular bourbon. What the heck, CC doesn't have to drive the sleigh!
     
  4. MrBIP

    MrBIP Active Member

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  5. EvanAltman36

    EvanAltman36 New Member

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    Whew, 12oz of bourbon should really give a nice kick. I added a little to my initial recipe but I'm still only about about 5.5oz. Of course, based on the calculations, my ABV is a little higher to begin with. I am also using 1oz of oak cubes vs. the 4oz you have, but I was wondering how the heavy vs. light toast would stack up. Thoughts?
     
  6. MrBIP

    MrBIP Active Member

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    Gotta be honest... it's my first go with such a thing, I'm going off researching thru internet posted recipes and discussion threads. Could turn out good, could learn a lesson.
     
  7. EvanAltman36

    EvanAltman36 New Member

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    Amen, brother. Best part about the process. Gotta admit, a lot of the research I did on using oak chips/cubes was sketchy or a little frightening. Lots of stuff about people overdoing it. And as much as I love drinking my beer, I like to share it too. It's much easier to proceed with caution and up the quantities of additives in subsequent batches.
     
  8. MrBIP

    MrBIP Active Member

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    All true, maybe I'll back it down a bit and see where it lands.
     
  9. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    In just about any case, it's easier to add flavoring at the end of the process than take it out. Dialing back on the oak is a good idea - beer should not taste like California Chardonnay!
     
  10. EvanAltman36

    EvanAltman36 New Member

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    Added the bourbon and oak Wednesday, so I'll be letting those kids hang out in the pool for a while. The sample I took yesterday was heavy with those two flavors, but I was pulling from the top. That said, there was some good nutmeg and cinnamon aroma as well. I'm looking forward to seeing how this ages out and I think it'll be nice and complex when it's all said and done.
     
  11. EvanAltman36

    EvanAltman36 New Member

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    So I kegged this brew on Friday 10/25 while I was brewing up a batch of blackberry wheat for SWMBO. I give my beers Cubs or baseball-themed names (but they still taste good), so this one is SEA's (her initials) Blackberry Wheat 'Til Next Year. But I digress.

    So I got it hooked up and pulled a quick sample, which was heavy on the oak. A nice balanced oak adds depth and character, but it's pretty bitter and harsh if it's overdone. Such was the case with this sample, but I had also just pulled it out of the fermentor and the oak cubes. Anyway, I had a 12-pack of New Belgium's winter sampler to polish off first, so I didn't get around to another trial of my beer until last night.

    Wow, what a difference just 4 days can make! While it's still there and still just a bit more assertive than I'd like, the oak flavor has receded. And as the carbonation takes hold a bit more, the aroma is getting even better; the cinnamon, clove, and nutmeg come through and it's almost like gingerbread or pumpkin pie. Very smooth and the bourbon is sensed more than tasted; it's that vapor of the alcohol that sort of lets you know, "Hey, I'm here too," but without being over the top. Finally, the aftertaste is a bit like slightly overdone gingerbread. It's not burned and black, but toasted to just shy of burning.

    This is why I like taking small samples, maybe 2-3oz, at regular intervals throughout the life of the beer. It's really cool to note the differences in the beer over time.
     
  12. Krimbos

    Krimbos Member

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    Wheat til Next Year. I love it.

    You must brew that one a lot!
     
  13. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

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    big differences in taste after carbonated, higher carbonation levels even more different, also aging will be even a drastic difference than the first few beers

    a beer that is slightly sweet can taste great with a higher carb with the carb bite replacing hops bittering
     
  14. EvanAltman36

    EvanAltman36 New Member

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    As the carbonation increases, the release of CO2 is definitely improving the aroma. Really good gingerbread/pumpkin pie smell to it, which is very appealing.

    Next up: white and black IPAs.
     

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