Permanent Haze In My Beer

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by SwampWater, Aug 1, 2013.

  1. SwampWater

    SwampWater Member

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    My light ale has a thick haze which will not go away after adding my usual addition of Gelatin. I use 100% RO water with mineral additions. I don't use a PH meter but rely on the predicted PH from the water calculator on this site.

    Here are my numbers for my Blonde Ale

    CA - 61.7
    MG - 10.4
    CI - 76.5
    S04 - 85.4
    PH - 5.6

    Was my PH too high? Would that be the reason for my soup like haze in my beer even at room temp? This is the first brew I have had that will not clear.

    Thanks,

    SwampWater
     
  2. LarryBrewer

    LarryBrewer Active Member

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    What type of yeast? Could be something going on there.

    Cool it down real good for a week and see if that helps.
     
  3. SwampWater

    SwampWater Member

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    The yeast was WLP060 American Ale Blend. I have used this a few times since last winter. They all cleared very well with basically the same recipe. Even after 2 weeks in kegs it didn't clear. I did notice that for some reason it was very hazy after the 60 min boil. Maybe I had conversion issues or something. I have brewed twice since then and the post boil was clear as usual. I went to get my Iodine and it had dried up.
     
  4. LarryBrewer

    LarryBrewer Active Member

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    That is a tough one. Chill haze is normal for home brewers. If you brewed the same exact recipe then it might have been a yeast issue.
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I'm thinking process. I usually do not use finings and get bright beers. Some questions to help diagnose the problem:

    - Are you doing extract, partial mash or all-grain?
    - What did you do differently this batch over previous (assumed bright) batches?
    - Are there any off-flavors in the beer such as astringency, acidic tastes, phenols, etc?
    - Did you use any unusual ingredients such as syrups, honey or fruits in the beer?

    If you were getting bright batches before, it's important to localize what changed. I rather doubt your water quality changed that rapidly and in general, water chemistry is one of the last places to look - other possible errors or causes of haze or flaws are much more likely, particularly if your beers have been successful in the past.
     
  6. pazu

    pazu New Member

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    Found this, perhaps you've seen it.

    About the address, looks like you have to copy/paste what's between the 's into your browser url field, to ...up.com/FileCabinet/TheNatureBeer_Hazes[1].pdf
     
  7. LarryBrewer

    LarryBrewer Active Member

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    +1 on the PDF.

    I might start doing longer cold crashes based on:
     
  8. SwampWater

    SwampWater Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I do need a bigger wort chiller though.
     

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