NEIPA water Calculation??

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Dr. Brewinstein, May 17, 2017.

  1. Dr. Brewinstein

    Dr. Brewinstein New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Thornton, Colorado
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,976
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    well one thing thats not crucial to taste but your bowels your magnesium is pretty high, I would try to lower that as much as possible, looks like you wanting a slightly bitter beer otherwise it looks good
     
  3. BoomerBrian

    BoomerBrian Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2016
    Messages:
    371
    Likes Received:
    216
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Software Developer
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    I keep my water pretty simple. I brew with distilled. For NEIPAs I add the following.

    1.5 g/gallon calcium chloride (195 ppm)
    .50 g/gallon gypsum (74 ppm)
     
    Korob and SnowRaven like this.
  4. m.mihai

    m.mihai Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2017
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Danish Technical Support
    This is my water profile for NEIPA:

    Calcium Magnesium Sodium Chloride Sulfate
    (Ca ppm) (Mg ppm) (Na ppm) (Cl ppm) (SO4 ppm)
    140 13 5 136 59

    I would start low on the Chloride to sulfate ratio, as the result might not suit you.

    Make sure the mash pH is in the 5-5.5 range and keep it low. Add salts to both mash and sparge water.

    Water is important in this style ( as is with all styles ), but the grainbill, yeast choice, fermentation temps and hop schedule are equally important.
     
    Ozarks Mountain Brew likes this.
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,390
    Likes Received:
    6,626
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    Your water profile is not going to ruin a beer. Adjusting water chemistry results in marginal improvements (given that your water tastes good and isn't too hard, say, San Antonio hard). The intense hop flavors of a NEIPA will cover any improvement you can get from water adjustment, again with the "too hard" caveat. If you were brewing a Helles, my answer would change but not for something this hoppy.
     
    Head First likes this.
  6. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2018
    Messages:
    4,701
    Likes Received:
    6,901
    Trophy Points:
    113
    As opposed to starting a new thread, I thought I would revive this old one. Looking at brewing a NE IPA for a get together with the gang in August. If I use this bottled water, will I need to make any adjustments? I am still learning the ins and outs of water chemistry, appreciate the input.
    Ca 76, Mg 28, Na 2, SO4 5, Cl 5, HCO3 285, NO3 2
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2018
    Messages:
    4,701
    Likes Received:
    6,901
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Should I start with distilled water and add gypsum and calcium chloride?
    I see many variances on grain bills for a NEIPA, should I decide on a grain bill before asking about the water profile?
     
  8. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2015
    Messages:
    959
    Likes Received:
    371
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    LHBS owner
    Location:
    NOLA
    NEIPA grain bills, I prefer a simpler bill, almost all 2-row and oats is the best character I've found... I've even done some White Wheat heavy NEIPAs that were really good.

    For water, I always build up from DI, I find it easier. Just a bit of Table Salt and Epsom should round out some character in the malt and harshness, and then I've really been preferring lately a profile of 200:50 or 200:75 on Chloride:Sulfate.

    my complete NEIPA profile I use is: Ca:100-130, Mg: 5, Na: 10, Cl: 200, SO4: 50
     

Share This Page

arrow_white