Mystery Hop IPA

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Craigerrr, Aug 10, 2020.

  1. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    I have some hops growing, which I have posted about in the hops growing thread, and they are doing very well. I will be picking and drying some soon. Trouble is, I have no idea what they are, and no idea what they might be best suited for. Should I just make a typical west coast style IPA with 60, 30, 10, whirlpool and dry hop additions, and see what I get? Or should I stick with a bittering hop that I know and trust (magnum), and use this hop for all of the other additions? Or should I.....

    Whaddya'all think?
     
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  2. Herm_brews

    Herm_brews Well-Known Member

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    SMASH IPA?
     
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  3. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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    Use a known bittering hop and use the mystery for flavor/aroma additions. That's what I'd do anyway:D
     
  4. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    A few years ago, as I was talking with a local nursery owner, she told me she had an abundance of hops that she had planted some time back and offered me as many as I could use. She couldn't remember what variety they were, but said they were ordered by a customer who was a home brewer and never picked up. It was getting close to hop harvest time, so I asked her to bring in a sample. I went to the nursery the next day and determined that they weren't quite ready to harvest. A week later she had another sample that looked and felt ready. I rubbed and sniffed and they had a mild citrusy aroma. The cone size and shape was similar to Cascade. I got a couple of buckets full and brewed a Pale Ale, using them at 60 (figuring 5% AA), 1/2 lb.in a 30 minute whirlpool, and another 1/2 lb. for dry hops.
    The resulting beer was very pleasant, but really didn't have any characteristics that led to confidently pinning down the hop variety. I took a few bottles to my local LHBS on learn to brew day. Some of the local craft brewers were there and sampled the beer. They all thought it to be a great Pale Ale, but none were able to confidently identify the hops used. We all agreed that Cascade and Cluster were strong possibilities, but the growing conditions had not produced hops that were typical to either variety.

    For an IPA, I think a neutral bittering hop is the way to go.
     
  5. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    Safe is known bittering hop, but if you're looking for something less controlled you could make a hop tea to get some idea of bitterness. Though you'd need some sort of control. Maybe your LHBS would donate a few grams of whole cones for a comparison.
     
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  6. AGbrewer

    AGbrewer Active Member

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    I would probably do a known bittering hop and then use the homegrown for aroma and 2-3 day dry hop. But before I did that, I would likely go with the suggestion that @Mark Farrall gave. That should give you and idea of what it might taste like.

    Hope it turns out good for you.
     
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