Mother's Milk Clone

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by jmcnamara, Sep 13, 2012.

  1. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    I wasn't getting any feedback on another board, so I'll try here. I'm looking for a Mother's Milk clone, and this is what I've come up with so far.

    HOME BREW RECIPE:
    Title: Mother's Milk Clone

    Brew Method: Extract
    Style Name: Sweet Stout

    FERMENTABLES:
    3.3 lb - Liquid Malt Extract - Dark (30.8%)
    1.1 lb - Milk Sugar - (late addition) (10.3%)
    3.3 lb - Liquid Malt Extract - Dark - (late addition) (30.8%)
    1 lb - Dry Malt Extract - Dark - (late addition) (9.3%)

    STEEPING GRAINS:
    0.75 lb - Caramel / Crystal 60L (7%)
    0.75 lb - Chocolate (7%)
    0.5 lb - Roasted Barley (4.7%)

    HOPS:
    1.1 oz - Fuggles (AA 4) for 60 min, Type: Pellet, Use: Boil
    1.1 oz - Kent Goldings (AA 4.5) for 15 min, Type: Pellet, Use: Boil

    YEAST:
    Wyeast - London ESB Ale 1968


    Any thoughts?

    Thanks!
     
  2. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    Full or partial boil?
    You may want to add some simple sugar to dry it out a bit.
    Black malt?
    I'm not familiar with that beer, but without more information on the recipe, I can't really give more advice.
    OG/FG ?
    Info from the Brewery?
    Seems like the bittering may be a bit low.
     
  3. Brewmaster Tom

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    Overall looks like a solid recipe but there is one change that I would make....get ride of the dark extract. Use the lightest possible extract you can find and then use your specialty grains to color your beer. There are a fine selection of dark grains that don't contribute astringency. Best of luck.

    CHEERS!!!
     

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