losing 1 gal to trub during racking

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by cy, Jul 7, 2014.

  1. cy

    cy New Member

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    I recently started using whirlfloc tabs in my boil and now I'm losing about a gallon of wort to trub. The trub is supper light and an does not settle. I can see the clear wort but cannot rack it out without pulling tons of trub into my primary. Today I started with 7 gal. at the start of the boil and by the end of 60min I was down to 5.5. After cooling and racking I had 4.5 gal. in the primary. Am I doing something wrong?
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    the trub was always there you just didn't see it because it was mixed with the wort, now its separating and falls to the bottom, so pulling into the fermenter isn't going to hurt anything but it will be clearer if its not there, I would just adjust your settings to account for more loss and make 6 gallon batches if you want to leave it in the pot, thats what I started doing
     
  3. nzbrew

    nzbrew Active Member

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    I do BIAB so have a lot of trub. I tip the whole lot into the fermentor, it settles out nicely after fermentation. If I'm leaving it for more than 2 weeks I use a secondary to get it off the trub/ yeast but otherwise don't worry about it.
    I am thinking next brew of whirlpooling, just to see how it goes.
     
  4. GernBlanston

    GernBlanston New Member

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    The trub is not toxic. It actually has proteins and other compounds necessary for healthy fermentation. If some or all gets into the fermenter, that's OK. Make beer and be happy.
     
  5. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    You could also pour what's left through a strainer bag and add it to the fermentor or use it for making starters.
    Lots of good left there!
    Brian
     
  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I strain the gunk in the bottom of my kettle into the fermentor then rack to secondary, leaving most of the gunk behind. Works well for me!
     
  7. cearum

    cearum Member

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  8. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    very interesting, I must say and shocked; but come to the conclusion that the trubby had hop particles in it which added to the sharper and slightly more bitter flavor and the non which did not making it a smoother flavor. as for the clarity, now that's shocking to say the least
     
  9. sbaclimber

    sbaclimber Well-Known Member

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    Cool read. Can't say I even ever knew that I "should" be worried about trub... :lol:
     
  10. glynn

    glynn New Member

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    change you batch volume. my pre boil is 7.75 which gives me 6 in the kettle and 5.5 in the fermenter
     
  11. coffeeguy

    coffeeguy New Member

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    The brulosophy article was indeed a good read and very informative! The principle makes sense; high flocculation with more particles mean that there are more large particles to 'latch onto' smaller particles and everything settles out quite well. I'm a big fan of weissbiers, any Hefeweizen in general, so I tend not to give a rat's rear end about how cloudy my beer is, but even the cloudiest Hefes I've brewed settle out almost crystal-clear with enough time.

    I don't like the thought of losing a big chunk of my post-boil volume to trub, but the alternatives aren't bad; either spend a couple more bucks and brew a gallon larger or just throw the whole lot into the fermenter and let it go. I've never entered any competitions and wouldn't expect to win, but have never had any complaints from friends/coworkers either about my brew either.
     

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