Late addition extract

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by rlbthree, Aug 22, 2014.

  1. rlbthree

    rlbthree New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2014
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm pretty new to brewing and have a question about late additions. I notice in recipes sometimes various ingredients are designated as "late addition". In general my question is at what time is "late addition" and also what is the purpose of being a late addition.

    In addition I've seen an extract recipe (I'm doing extract brewing at this point) that called for half the DME to be a "late addition". What's up with that?
     
  2. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2014
    Messages:
    528
    Likes Received:
    264
    Trophy Points:
    63
    late addition of extract is to keep your beer lighter in color, and not get as much caramelizing of the sugars. it also helps with hop utilization, so you can get to the desired IBU with less hops. when you add all the extract, the wort is very thick and it doesn't pick up the acids from the hops as easy. the thick wort also undergoes Malliard reactions, darkening the color, and can burn some of the sugars, leaving the beer sweeter and caramelly. Adding half of the extract late can help alleviate this. usually in late extract addition, you add 1/3-1/2 of the extract at the beginning of the boil, then add the remaining amount with about 15 minutes left in the boil. this allows it to mix in and be pasteurized.

    other ingredients that call for late additions are usually hops or spices. in the case of hops, if they are added to the boil for the full hour, the acids in them are converted to iso-acids, which give the beer its bitterness, but most if not all the flavor and aroma is boiled away. so you add some hops at the beginning for bitterness and some later, to add hoppy flavor and aroma. flavor hops are usually added with 20-30 minutes left to boil and aroma hops with 15 or less. spices are usually added with 15 minutes left to boil, enough time to pasteurize them and extract the flavors, but not so long as to have the flavor boil off.
     
    TimboChuck likes this.
  3. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,977
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    +1 for above also if someone has a late sugar, its just to add more alcohol without the chance of being boiled off or just to get the yeast started faster, 15 minutes is fine, I've even added it at 1 minute and stirred along with my yeast nutrient
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,418
    Likes Received:
    6,671
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    I've added at flameout and let stand ten minutes. That's enough to pasteurize just about anything with no loss of flavor.
     
    TimboChuck likes this.
  5. MrBIP

    MrBIP Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2012
    Messages:
    495
    Likes Received:
    29
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    I usually add an sugars (boiled in an appropriate amount of water ahead of time) at flame out and whirlpool while I'm chilling. Never had an issues.
     
  6. johncieera

    johncieera New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2014
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Appreciate your detailed answer. Helped me a lot. Thank you
     
    TimboChuck likes this.

Share This Page

arrow_white