Koelleweizen

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Nosybear, Mar 11, 2014.

  1. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Okay, I stole this idea from St. Arnold Brewing in Galveston. Basically it's a Koelsch fermented with Hefeweizen yeast. Here's the recipe:

    http://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/r ... -improved-

    The "New and Improved" bit comes about because I've brewed this before and taken a gold in a non-sanctioned contest with it. So of course, improvements (can't leave well enough alone):

    - Double decoction (Hochkurz process)
    - Simplified grain bill (Decrapification - the decoction should provide me the malt flavor I want)
    - Acidification using acidulated malt
    - Water treatment to reach a residual alkalinity of -40 ppm
    - Sparge water acidified to 5.4 pH
    - Controlled fermentation (<65 degrees) and "lagering" (50 degrees).

    So have at it, guys. I know this violates my "one change at a time" mantra but I've used most of the changes in other brews, to great effect. What do you think?
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    looks good, keep us informed on your mashing steps :D
     
  3. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    Looks like a vegi burger! Where's the wheat?
    Hehehe
    Sorry I really like a good hefe.
    You may be screwing with the water too much though.
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Water treatment isn't that complex and its entire purpose is to bring down mash pH. I cut my tap water in half with distilled water, use some acidulated malt in the mash and add calcium as chloride or sulfate (in this case, more chloride to soften the hop favor). Sometimes I may add a bit of magnesium. I aim for residual alkalinity based on SRM and the range for a beer this light is -70 to -30.
     
  5. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    Looks like a good way to help bring on the first nice sunny days of spring. Does the fruity clove of the 380 come out without the wheat? Just curious.
     
  6. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    The fruity clove has come out in previous versions. One of my dilemmas is whether to use 380 or to try 300 for more banana esters, although when I ferment with 300 I get more clove through cool fermentation and under pitching. That reminds me, I need to put a Hefeweizen in the fridge....
     

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