Gas and second fermentation problems

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by benja.leiva, Feb 16, 2016.

  1. benja.leiva

    benja.leiva New Member

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    HEy brewers i am benjamin from Arica-Chile, this last time i was getting problem with my second fermentation , then i started to putt the sugar bottle per bottle but still not fermenting well and No gas at all, so i can't understand why.
    I was thinking that maybe because after first fermentation i keep the beer for long time at cold temperature for cold settle , so maybe i kill all the yeast? what should i do?
    Thanks guys!
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    Your correct, you don't cold crash before bottling if using yeast to carbonate, you cold crash after carbonation, you can settle the trub some but not very cold for a ling time, cold crashing before is mostly for kegging where you use C02 to carbonate
     
  3. EbonHawk

    EbonHawk New Member

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    Ever since I started a pilsner recently, I've been browsing the forums and reading a lot about the cold storage of beer (lagering) and many, many people say it's fine to store the beer at near-freezing temps (around 36°F) for about a month to lager, and then the bottles will carbonate just fine at room temps... *confused*
     
  4. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    I lager at 34° My lagers have all eventually carbonated, maybe after a month and a half.
     
  5. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    the key here is from the secondary, not the primary and the yest flocculation is very crucial , a high flocculating yeast will drop to the bottom very quickly and if you use a Auto-Siphon and pull off that yeast from the secondary then you might not have enough to carbonate, if its a low or medium then the yeast is more likely to stay in solution and work as expected and the "op" isn't talking about lagering
     
  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    In general, unless you filter, there's always some yeast left in suspension and it takes a minuscule amount to carbonate the beer. As previously mentioned, I've lagered beer for three months then bottled with no yeast addition, carbed just fine. Adding the sugar bottle by bottle - first thing that comes to mind is was enough sugar added? Did the beer somehow get hot enough to kill yeast (about 120 degrees Fahrenheit)? Could something else have killed the yeast? I've had under-carbed beer from too little priming sugar but never no carbonation at all.
     
  7. flars

    flars New Member

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    How long has the beer been in the bottles? What temperature are you holding the bottles at?

    Three weeks is about the optimum time for the lower gravity beers to carbonate. Then a few days of chilling will force the carbonation into the beer. Higher gravity beers may take five weeks or longer to carbonate. Good temperature to hold your bottled beer at for carbonation is 70°to 74°F (21°to 23°C).

    The yeast is there. You can only kill the yeast by raising the temperature of the beer over 120°F (48°C).
     

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