Force Carbonation Question

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Brewer #311816, Mar 28, 2020.

  1. Brewer #311816

    Brewer #311816 New Member

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  2. Hamner Brewhouse

    Hamner Brewhouse Active Member

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    It varies but generally 1 week. You can speed up process by cranking the psi to 40 psi for 24-36 hours. Then drop it down to 10 psi for 3 or 4 days.
     
  3. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    I typically set the pressure at 35 psi for two days, then turn down to about 10-12, and I am GTG
     
  4. Brewer #311816

    Brewer #311816 New Member

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    gtg after 2 days? or leave on 10-12 for how many days and then gtg??
     
  5. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    Basically that calculator is showing you the pressure to use until the keg is dead. And it's expecting you to connect it for 1-2 weeks before you pull a beer. There's other charts that will tell you fancy ways to get to the serving pressure more qucikly.

    Generally I don't bother with those. I just connect the keg, wait a week or two and enjoy. Or if I sneak a beer a little earlier I expect it to be undercarbonated and enjoy that for what it is.
     
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  6. west1m

    west1m Active Member

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    My kegerator has room for two 5 gal kegs. I always leave the CO2 at 10 PSI. When I make a new batch and get in the keg I set in the fridge and connect the CO2 (second line off the same 10 PSI regulator) . By the time I finish the first keg the new one is ready.
     
  7. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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    #7 thunderwagn, Mar 28, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2020
    Elevation also plays a role on where to set your regulator. I'm over 5000 ft above sea level and have my reg set at 14.5#.
    These days I also ferment under pressure and have my spunding valve set at 15#. My beer is basically ready to go as soon as it's transferred to the serving keg.

    I like the brulosophy force carb method of setting the pressure high for a given amount of time and then dropping to serving pressure. Works great!
    http://brulosophy.com/methods/carbonation-methods/
     
  8. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    After 2 days at 35#, and reducing to 10#, it is pourable, sometimes a little undercarbed, but it gets there. You just have to figure out what works best for you. I always force carb as described, but that is just me.
     
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  9. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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    Solid method for sure that worked great for me also!
     
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  10. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

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    If you’re in a hurry, you can chill the keg, pressurize to 30 psi, shake the hell out of the keg, and repeat a time or two. The carbonation is a little unpredictable, but if you need the keg for a party (or if you’re just out of beer), it works quickly.
     
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  11. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    I have done that too. If you are working from home, hit the keg with 30 or 35 psi, disconnect it from the C02, put it on it's side under your desk and roll it back and forth for 15 minutes. Top up with 30 to 35 again, and repeat a second time. Then give it a try. If it is mostly carbed up put it in the fridge at 10-12 (or whatever serving pressure works for you), and Robert is your Mothers Brother!
    Good luck!
    Oh, hey, you will want to use 3/16" beverage line, and you will have to experiment with length, but 10 feet is a good starting point.
     
  12. Brewer #314799

    Brewer #314799 New Member

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    I'm new to home brew. My local pet store can sell me barley for $1.00 kg. Is this type of barley suitable for making beer?
     
  13. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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    I can't give you a solid no because I don't know for sure but, grains are typically grown for a specific purpose. Like brewing and distilling. The quality of these grains would be better I'm sure. I would doubt feed grains would be malted but I could be wrong. I've never checked any of the feed we use at home to see if it's malted.
    For me, it's not worth saving some change and buying grains that were made for brewing. That said, people use all kinds of things to brew beer with that aren't specifically made for brewing.
    Interesting question!
     
  14. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    You can use it. It's not malted so you would have to mash it with malt. I believe barley gelatinizes at mash temperatures so a cereal mash is not necessary. And if you didn't understand any part of that, don't use it.
     
  15. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Same this is what I do, and in 3-4 days you're drinking it.
     
  16. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Unless you want to malt it yourself that's a no. Unmalted barley won't do what you want. This might help wrap your head around it.



    Unfortunately beer grade barley costs more unless you do it yourself, which is doable but takes a long ass time.
     
  17. Brewer #248031

    Brewer #248031 New Member

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    I use a carbonation stone. Get the beer down to about 35 deg F., set the pressure at target pressure + 4 psi (the stone's pressure). 24 hrs later, it's done.
     

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