First Time Making Own Recipe - Stout

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by LiverpoolFC, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. LiverpoolFC

    LiverpoolFC New Member

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    Just looking for some feedback. This is my first time making my own recipe. I have done several extract kits and would like to venture out and take the next step.

    Please look over. Any and all feedback would be greatly appreciated.

    Also is this one that I could just steep the grains or need to partial mash.

    Thanks in advance.

    Brew Method: Partial Mash
    Style Name: Stout
    Boil Time: 60 min
    Batch Size: 5.5 gallons (fermentor volume)
    Boil Size: 4 gallons
    Boil Gravity: 1.092
    Efficiency: 35% (brew house)

    STATS:
    Original Gravity: 1.067
    Final Gravity: 1.022
    ABV (standard): 5.82%
    IBU (tinseth): 24.95
    SRM (morey): 40

    FERMENTABLES:
    7 lb - Dry Malt Extract - Light (58.3%)
    1.5 lb - American - Caramel / Crystal 120L (12.5%)
    1 lb - Flaked Oats (8.3%)
    1 lb - American - Roasted Barley (8.3%)
    0.5 lb - Lactose (Milk Sugar) (4.2%)
    1 lb - United Kingdom - Pale Chocolate (8.3%)

    HOPS:
    2 oz - Willamette, Type: Pellet, AA: 4.5, Use: Boil for 45 min, IBU: 19.64
    1 oz - Willamette, Type: Pellet, AA: 4.5, Use: Boil for 15 min, IBU: 5.31

    MASH GUIDELINES:
    1) Temperature, Temp: 154 F, Time: 60 min, Amount: 3 gal, All Grains Together

    YEAST:
    White Labs - British Ale Yeast WLP005
    Starter: Yes
    Form: Liquid
    Attenuation (avg): 70.5%
    Flocculation: High
    Optimum Temp: 65 - 70 F
    Fermentation Temp: 70 F

    NOTES:
    Partial Mash
    Heat to 170 F - Strike Temp
    Add Grain
    Mash at 154 for 60 mins
    Sparge Grain (170 F)

    Boil 60 mins

    Add Lactose @ 15 mins

    ***might use English Ale Yeast WLP002
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    First, you can steep the grains. In fact, you have to because there's nothing that will convert itself.

    Second, don't see anything wrong with the recipe. Grain bill should produce a good, dark stout with chocolate notes and some toasty flavors. I'm wondering about the second hops addition - it's not really "to style" but hey, it's homebrew and its yours so do what you feel. As far as yeast goes, WLP 002 should give you pretty good results. This is how White Labs rates it for differing styles:

    http://www.whitelabs.com/yeast/wlp002-english-ale-yeast

    You might consider WLP 004 as well - the yeast is going to make the most difference and stouts are generally dry so I'd go with a higher attenuating English, Scottish or Irish ale yeast.

    Good luck with it and let us know how it comes out.
     
  3. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    He's doing a partial mash, everything mashes but the DME, Great Recipe, the hops might seem pretty mellow for the type of beer but that might be your intention so great job
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    There's nothing in the grain bill that will convert, so partial mashing, unless he replaces some of the DME with malt, will in essence be a steep. Still, should be a good recipe and with 7# of DME, a very stout Stout.
     
  5. LiverpoolFC

    LiverpoolFC New Member

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    Sounds great...thanks for the advice. It makes sense as there is no malt and only specialty grains. Therefore steeping the grains at 155 F for 30 mins will get the same results. When doing the steep would you recommend rinsing the grains with a gallon of water at 168 F to get the full color out or just let the grain bag drip out.
     
  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    The rinse will get you more of the sugars out of the grains. Nothing over 170° though - can get tannins.
     

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