Final volume less than anticipated

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by LaneyJoe, Oct 25, 2019.

  1. LaneyJoe

    LaneyJoe New Member

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    Hi everyone!

    we are just getting into the brewing process and everything has been going really well! We started off with a 5 gallon batch from a kit that yielded 4.5 gallons. Once we started an all grain brew of 5 gallons we yielded 3.5 gallons in the end. We thought doubling our batch would be best since we could double the amount of beer in the same amount of time...that is not happening. We just finished our first 10 gallon batch and we ended up with 5.5-6 gallons in our fermenter. Our question is why are we loosing so much beer?!

    Any suggestions or tips would be greatly appreciated!

    thank you!
    Laney
     
  2. uk_brewer

    uk_brewer Well-Known Member

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    So many variables.
    1. Is this all grain, or extract
    2. If all grain, biab vs a more traditional fly or batch sparge set up.
    3. Boil off rate. Measure pre-boil vs post boil volumes
    4. Other losses in your process, kettle and mash tun dead space, hoses, trub etc.
     
  3. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

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    Sounds like you need to nail down your losses and dial in your setup so to speak, we really can't tell you how, every set up is different
     
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  4. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    Since your last batch was all grain, I'll list where you lose volume during that process. You can eliminate items that don't apply for previous batches.

    1. Grain absorption.
    2. mash/lauter tun losse(s).
    3. Boil off.
    4. Kettle losses. You can add misc. losses to pumps, chiller, hoses. etc. here.
    5. Fermenter losses.

    The video on the linked page below will show you how to set up an equipment profile that will account for your losses and give you a good idea of the starting volume needed to end up with the volume you planned for. It is directed to those who use BeerSmith software, but can be easily applied to any quality program.
    http://brulosophy.com/2014/08/04/beersmith-tutorial-equipment-profile-setup/
     
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  5. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    Is your gravity higher than expected? It's best to boil for gravity and not for volume. You end up with the beer you wanted and not with an imperial.
     
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  6. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    As all above looks like your losses are greater than you are anticipating I see your initial batch target was 5gal you yielded 3.5 so come up quite short. I'm imagining that your original starting gravity was way higher than you anticipated as well?

    So when you doubled to 10gal and yielded 6gal in fermentor you were consistent with your losses from 5gal brew.
    Obviously you need to start with 1.5 gal more mash water / 5gal batch and you should be yielding near your target volume.

    If we're me
    Next batch record in detail your starting volume preboil volume post boil volume and fermentor volume you can use these numbers to help find your systems losses.
    Add/subtract from there and brew brew brew.
     

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