Extract to all grain conversion

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by geaux_brew, Feb 29, 2020.

  1. geaux_brew

    geaux_brew New Member

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    This may have been asked in here before, but I couldn't find it. I am looking for a good way to convert an extract recipe to an all grain. I have tried a beer from a brewers best kit: Sweet Dreams Almond Coconut Stout: http://brewersbestkits.com/assets/1032_sweetdreamsstout_recipe.pdf

    I first tried the beer at my local home brew supply store. I bought a kit and I am going to make one myself. However in the future I would like to try and make an all grain version and have it taste as close as possible to the kit.

    Does anyone have any references or suggestions on how to do this?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    "How to Brew" by John Palmer. Either the book or the website. Both give you conversion procedures.
     
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  3. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

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    For 2-row malt, you will need right around 1.25 pounds of malt to replace 1.0 pounds of liquid extract. That is with a 75% brew house efficiency. If substituting DME, you’ll need about 1.5 pounds of malt for every pound of dry extract.

    The easiest way to calculate this is to enter your original recipe in the recipe tool and substitute until you get the right OG.
     
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  4. Ward Chillington

    Ward Chillington Well-Known Member

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  5. geaux_brew

    geaux_brew New Member

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    Thanks my fellow Louisianian, I will check it out. I think the specialty grains will be a little harder to dial in the correct amounts on and get the correct favor.
     
  6. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Would they not be sold as that (specialty grains) for steeping with the extract version?
    Therefore just a matter of subbing the extract for ale malt to make up the gravity?
     
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  7. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

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    I think you would need to subtract the converted sugars that are converted in the mash from the steeping grains from the amount of base malt. Adding the steeping grains to the max will add more fermenter sugars. When steeping, most of the crystal malts will add about 15 ppg, versus about 30 ppg mashed.

    So after you determine how much base malt you need, you could probably subtract about a half pound of base malt for every pound of steeping malt. This will get you in the ballpark and probably be close enough that you don't notice (assuming you have a good mash technique).

    If you want an exact conversion, I would prefer to the Palmer book mentioned above.
     
  8. geaux_brew

    geaux_brew New Member

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    Thanks everyone. I think I have a good starting point with the all grain now. I will tweak it each time to dial it in just right.
     

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