Dry vs slurry

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Brew Cat, Dec 4, 2015.

  1. Brew Cat

    Brew Cat Active Member

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    My last 10 gallons of .060 IPA I used 400ml US05 slurry in one bucket and and two dry packs in the other. Both had 4.75 gallons of wort pitched at 65deg together. They both took off at about the same time. I went away for 4 days and the slurry had no more pressure in the air lock ,but the dry was chugging away. After 7 days the dry is still bubbling. MI pulled the lid on both krausen on dry non on the slurry .004 done. It was probably done a couple days ago. The slurry is six or more generations and I was planning on retiring it but now I'm not sure. Do you think it mutated for the better?
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Likely not. If you pitched the dry yeast without rehydrating it, you killed off half the cells. Your experiment wasn't a test of dry vs. slurry, it was a test of pitch rate. The higher pitch rate of the slurry will naturally finish faster than the lower pitch rate of the dry yeast. You'd have off flavors if your yeast had mutated so if the beer from the slurry is still tasting good, keep brewing with it.
     
  3. Brew Cat

    Brew Cat Active Member

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    I was wondering about the .004 that's low. Wonder where the dry will go. No I didn't rehydrate maybe I'll start but maybe slow and steady is better. I guess I'll see soon.
     
  4. GernBlanston

    GernBlanston New Member

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    True.

    In addition, the slurry is active and ready to go. The dry needs some time to hydrate, absorb oxygen and build up some sterols in the cell wall, and then start consuming sugars. So the time difference is understandable.
     
  5. Brew Cat

    Brew Cat Active Member

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    But I said they both started at the same time and both were vigorous.
     
  6. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    one has to grow, the other has already grown, the slurry wins hands down for me every time
     
  7. Brew Cat

    Brew Cat Active Member

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    I mostly pitch slurry but I as short for ten Gallons since I have multiple fermenters going now so I figured it would be a fun experiment. So far the slurry batch has a dry hop in the fermenter probably keg it with some more hops Sunday . Hopefully the dry will be done soon. The next test will be the taste test my favorite test
     
  8. GernBlanston

    GernBlanston New Member

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    The delay I referred to is the extra time the dry needed to finish. They may appear to start together and be vigorous, but the slurry yeast all started eating as a mob, and the dry was working through some stages.
     

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