Drinking My First Beer!!

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by TetersMillBrewing, May 31, 2020.

  1. TetersMillBrewing

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    Well, the results from my first all-grain beer(s) are in and I am HOOKED! The first was a Strawberry Blonde (OG - 1.057 / FG - 0.995). As expected, based on all the help provided here, it was not the best but is drinkable. The second beer was an Oatmeal Stout (OG - 1.072 / FG 1.030), great flavor but not exactly what I wanted, already working on some small modifications to the recipe for the next batch (pictured). The third beer was a Chocolate Coffee Stout (OG - 1.070 / FG 1.023) which came out about as perfect in flavor as we could ever hope for.

    Although the beers where great, and I am very satisfied with the results, I of course have more questions. Both the Stouts missed the final gravity that the Brewers Friend recipe had listed (Oatmeal 1.030 vs 1.020 expected, Coffee Stout 1.023 vs 1.016 expected). Any feedback on what some of the more obvious items that would cause poor attenuation (think that is the correct term) would be appreciated.

    Thanks again for all of the feedback and help over the past few weeks.

    oatmealstout.jpg
     
    YaleH, BOB357, Blackmuse and 6 others like this.
  2. Josh Hughes

    Josh Hughes Well-Known Member

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  3. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

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    One suggestion from personal experience:
    I find almost all of my Stouts and Porters will attenuate to the low side of a yeast's range. When setting up your recipe in BF, I would change the predicted attenuation that BF uses and move it to the low end for that particular yeast. In other words, if you use S-04 and the range is 70-80% attenuation, set your attenuation in the recipe on BF to 70%. (I believe BF will default to a mid point, say 75% for this example.)

    That's the difference between:
    OG 1.070, FG 1.021 = 70%
    Vs.
    OG 1.070, FG 1.017-1.018 = 75%

    So that might explain some of the difference you are seeing and it's still perfectly within the yeast's range.
     
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  4. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    You may have mashed high and I'm guessing there is quite a bit of caramel malt in the grist this can create a lot of unfermentable sugars that the yeast won't consume in fermentation.
    Or maybe fermentation wasn't quite done and was dragging it's feet.

    I got some low attenuation recently on my choc coffee stout.
    Another thing is yeast pitch amount wasn't right maybe you under pitched a tad and the yeast ran out of steam and didn't get the job done.
     
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  5. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    I'm with Megary, all my dark beers attenuate less than the prediction. My attenuation for light beers is fine and will often attenuate at the top of the range. I end up just manually setting the attenuation after I've done a few batches as I much prefer a slightly lower attenuation on a dark beer than full attenuation.
     
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  6. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    For the win!
     
  7. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    #7 Blackmuse, Jun 2, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2020
    Megary has given some solid advice for dark beers.

    Trailben mentioned a high mash and this could be but you would know better than us. If you mashed on the high side 156+ and had a "thick mash" then this would certainly lead to less attenuation.

    I brew with 2 dry strains of yeast pretty regularly (Nottingham and 34/70) and have used them in many different a styles and temp ranges - because of this I am very comfortable with these yeasts and know them well. My attenuation is thus, typically pretty spot on because I know what to expect in certain situations and environments. - my point here - you really have to use a yeast quite a few times to get to know it's ins and outs.(Just my opinion)
     
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  8. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    Oh! And it is great to hear that you are fully immersed and enjoying the fruits of your labor all while still seeking improvements! Cheers!
     
  9. TetersMillBrewing

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    I had read the high mash but didn't understand it until your post. My strike water is normally at 156 and the grain is pretty close to 68 degrees so far. After adding grain my temperature settles out at 152 pretty much for the entire hour. Sounds like it is lower attenuation and not that I know where that setting is I will adjust and see how it comes out.

    Thanks Everyone
     
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  10. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Yeah thats the theory high mash oh and over shorter time = less fermentables wort.

    Low mash temp over long period = highly fermentables wort.
     
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  11. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    As long as your thermometer is accurate, 152F is low enough that it shouldn't cause an attenuation problem.
     

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