Cranberry Saison - when to add Cranberry Extract

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by TonyDiBratto, May 6, 2019.

  1. TonyDiBratto

    TonyDiBratto New Member

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    Hi there I am doing a Cranberry Saison

    Adding the Saison Extract to the secondary. Best I can tell, its a flavoring extract. I don't believe it has any sugar

    https://www.ontariobeerkegs.com/Natural_Cranberry_Flavouring_Extract_4oz_p/nat-flav-cranberry.htm

    I am using WLP565 Belgium Saison yeast. Starting around 1.050 and is now 1.014. After 9 days. Started at 65F and been slowly bringing it to 75/76F over last 4 days,,

    My questions:
    1. Should I just pour the extract into the conical?
    2. Should I dump the trub first?
    3. Should I drop the temp back to about 70F before adding the extract?
    4. Should I then let it sit another 10 days or so in conical at 70F or 75F?
    5. I assume for a Saison we want this to dry out down to 1.005 or 1.010. If it doesn't move any should I add some additional year?
    6. Should I be adding and purging conical with CO2 as there is little yeast activity and I need to open to add extract? Don't want to let oxygen exposure in

    thx
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    It is indeed an extract. I'd add it to taste at packaging. Fermenting will not change the extract's flavor and you are likely right - it likely has no sugars.

    As far as the rest of the questions, none of them matter much as far as the flavoring is concerned.
     
  3. 56 Firedome

    56 Firedome Active Member

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    Tony, I make a Peach IPA & a Blood Orange IPA. Both use the raw fruit pureed & strained. I add the juice to the secondary & hold for a week to ten days @ 45 degs.
    Both are big favs in my neighborhood.
     
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  4. Mase

    Mase Well-Known Member

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    The Peach IPA sounds delicious. I’ve been pondering a nice peach IPA. Is that a recipe you’d share. No worries if you don’t. But they both sound good. And receiving the neighborhood’s approval... well that makes even more appealing. :)
     
  5. TonyDiBratto

    TonyDiBratto New Member

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    Thanks. The Blood Orange IPA sounds juicy.. I went and looked here on BREWERSFRIEND and found a recipe which uses 5 LBs in primary. Puts the whole crushed fruit in.
     
  6. 56 Firedome

    56 Firedome Active Member

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    Tony & Mase --
    I originally used the raw fruit puree, made from Colorado Palisade Peaches. I always wait until the peak of the season is approaching & then I buy 16 Culls. Over ripe & maybe bruised. They are the juiciest & they are way cheaper but you have to use them right away. When I used the puree the IPA was not just hazy, it was cloudy, but it tasted great & the color was beautiful.
    I started straining the puree 1st through a colander & then through a fine mesh Hop Bag. The result was about 2 Qts of clear Peach Juice. I racked the Primary on to the Peach Juice in the Secondary & held it 45 deg for 2 weeks. When I used the Puree, Fermentation would restart in the Secondary, not so with the Juice. Maybe residual Yeast from the Primary?
    As far as the recipe goes, it is just a normal IPA, mine is a paramutation from the Mitch Steele "IPA" book.
    The Blood Orange is pretty much the same drill except I buy 8 to 10 Oranges when they are available in the Grocery Store, Juice them the same way & then freeze the Juice for use later. The Peaches are available in the fall & the Blood Oranges are available in the spring.
    Enjoy but I suggest the Juice over Puree in both recipes.
     
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  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I do the same (did you know Texas limits the size of the peaches we can export to them to avoid making their Fredricksburg peaches look puny?). Peaches are tough to work with! You need a lot of them, minimum two pounds per gallon, for perceptible flavor. Then you're stuck with the separation process.... Although it looks like you might be onto something with juicing the peaches - I hadn't thought of that and so may try the entire miserable process of getting good Colorado peaches into my beer yet again!
     
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  8. 56 Firedome

    56 Firedome Active Member

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    I wash the Peaches & then put them in a Colander nested in a big bowl.. That gets the Puree. I use a large fine mesh Hop Sack & squeeze the juice into another bowl. You can freeze the juice & use it when you want. I buy the Palisades Peaches on the corner or from a farmers market. I'm buying half a flat of culls. Use them right away. Their juicy & ugly but you don't care, you just want the juice.
     
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