Could someone explain the yeast starter caculator.

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by mah712rn, Jan 25, 2014.

  1. mah712rn

    mah712rn New Member

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    I was trying to use the yeast starter calculator and am not sure how to proceed to the second and third steps if the first is not enough. How long should the first sit? Do you add that whole volume to the next step ( so if I used 1 L the next step calls for 1 L i now have 2?)
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    you can add more yeast in the first form, 11 g is whats in a normal dry packet today , so 22 would be 2 yeast and so on

    click the grab from above in the second to add to a starter then you can change the gravity of the starter in the second also the size from 1L to 2L the get your target

    does this make sense?

    now this doesn't change the recipe settings at all, its just for your information when brewing
     
  3. mah712rn

    mah712rn New Member

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    That makes sense but when I use say one pack and now it says not enough so I go to second step when and what do I ad? just DME?
     
  4. chessking

    chessking New Member

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    Let the yeast settle out and decant the liquid, then add DME wort that has been boiled and cooled, and around 1.040 gravity, aerate well, then let it go. After the second stage is done and settled out, decant the liquid before pitching. leave just enough liquid so you can shake up the solids to make it pourable. Aerate this starter by swirling it, and be sure the wort your pitching to has been aerated as well.
     
  5. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    you need to learn how to create a starter I'm guessing? watch this

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMhFerNTwbQ

    you would tell it how big your starter is and what the gravity is
     
  6. Foster82

    Foster82 New Member

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    I think you understand how to use the starter tool on the site, but its the actual building of the starter that is tripping you up.

    So when you are going to a second step make sure that your yeast are done doing their thing, which can be anywhere from 24-48 hours depending on the viability of your yeast. When I step my starters up I simply add the require amount of wort on top of the existing starter, aerate and let it go. So if I did a 1 liter starter and need another step and one more liter will get me to my target pitch rate, I will simply add another liter of wort once the first step has finished (2 liters total in my vessel). This is completely dependent on the size of your starter vessel, I will normally not fill my starter vessel more than half way in order to prevent a blow-off. If I don't have enough room I will decant before going to the next step. Before decanting put the starter in the fridge for 24 hours to allow the yeast cake to pack down nice and tight.

    An important thing to note is that when using the starter calculator only put the amount of wort you plan to add at a particular step in as the starter size. So if i did step one with 1 liter and was going to add another liter at step 2, the starter size for both steps would be 1 liter. So I would be using two 1 liter starters, and not a 1 liter and a 2 liter.

    Also I have uploaded some pictures of my latest starter to show before and after. Its the same starter just 24 hours apart. This starter ended up being 4 steps, in order to grow a slant large enough for a 10 gallon lager.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. mah712rn

    mah712rn New Member

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    That makes it much more clear. Thank you. One last question. when you "decant" do you just pour off the excess fluid after the yeast has settled from refrigeration?
     
  8. 7 Slot Brewing

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    Yes. You want to pour off the "mini beer" and get to just the good yeast slurry.

    Though it should be noted some people just pitch liquid and slurry into their beer. A personal preference on how close to style,volujmne, etc you want to be.
     

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