Construction methods

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Ward Chillington, Jan 5, 2019.

  1. Ward Chillington

    Ward Chillington Well-Known Member

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    #1 Ward Chillington, Jan 5, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2019
    Hey DIY'ers of brew stands and other stuff; I need some ideas on how best to use my resources for a sturdy stand and a kettle modification.

    First the easy one, a simple mod to my SST brewers best lid so I can hand the thing off the kettle when I need to for quick access and such. My old Polarware had a hook on the underside of the lid that was great but not being a welder I am a little short on that. I was thinking of drilling a hole in the lip then looping some stainless wire around one of the kettle's side handles and just hook the thing on there as needed. What else should I consider or am I over thinking? JFDI!

    The other issue is which materials lend themselves best to a brewing sculpture? 20190105_132049.jpeg I have access to L stock ( the stuff with the weird hole on the right), Kindorff ( sp?? the stuff with the oval holes on the left) and the holey square stock (in the middle). The issue again, I am not a welder! So how best to join these 3 different stock types with bolts? I would really like to use the holey square stock since it's the strongest of the 3 but I do not know of a product that you can stick in them for joining right angles especially if you want to join them on the same plane as in not one on top of the other. Any ideas?
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Go with the stuff with the round holes in the middle for the load-bearing verticals. You can use the stuff with the oblong holes for the lateral load-bearing supports, the light-weight stuff with the funny holes for bracing and as a support for shelves with light loads. Short bolts, washers and a lock washer on every joint. The square stock is overkill.
     
  3. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

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    I was thinking the same thing but also all of them will rust eventually so paint or something is needed
     
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  4. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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    I can't 100% tell from the angle of your photo, but the stuff on the far left (with oval holes) looks to me like 1" 5/8th's unistrut. If that's the case, there are tons of fittings, strut nuts, angles, feet, etc. made to be used with it. All come at a cost, but fit, work and provide stability.
    Strut nuts (I prefer without spring) bolts, and washers are a must. Then you'd need to decide from there. Strut 90's for example. It's actually very simple to work with, but then again I've worked with it on an almost daily basis for years. 3/8th's hardware should do you just fine. Fastenal and Grainger typically carry hardware. Not sure about places Like Home Depot or Lowe's.
    https://www.unistrut.us/products/1-5-8-metal-framing/channel-nuts-and-hardware

    https://www.unistrut.us/products/1-5-8-metal-framing/general-fittings/ninety-degree-fittings

    Navigate around the unistrut site. It'll give you an idea on how to use the stuff.
     
  5. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    The stuff to the left is called Uni-Strut and it’s looks like it’s galvanized. It’s used in electrical construct and I seen it used to make shelving and brackets. It has a complete system of brackets to connect to all kinds of angles and spring nuts that are used to bolt the brackets and uni-strut pieces together. The oblong holes are used so you can slide bolts to range of positions. If you have the heavier 1-5/8” galvanized strut, that stuff is very sturdy. It comes in 10’ pieces. Generally speaking, it would be the easiest stuff to use.

    Uni-strut is sold at Lowes, Home Depot, Menards and a lot of electrical warehouses. It can be connected without welding, but I’m not sure how much the brackets and spring nuts will run you. These sort of projects start out cheap, but sometimes they can get spendy. It’s still pretty fun.
     
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  6. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Looks like your covered for rust going with galvanized steel there. Since Its pretty cheap I used timber for my simple brew stand but slapped on many many layers of paint ibhad laying around here. Plenty of water is splashed about in my brewery. My only little tip is castors so you can wheel your brew stand whereever you want. I brew on an aggregate concrete surface in patio . 20190106_073056.jpg
    Bit rough and ready but that's me.
    This is what I did with my lid
    20190106_073034.jpg
    That's as far as I could force that stainless screw into the keggle trust me it's fastened in well.
     
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