Conditioning and Maturation

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Marcelo_Arantes, Feb 24, 2019.

  1. Marcelo_Arantes

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2018
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    31
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I am a little confused about this question, and I'd appreciate some tips, books to read, articles, and what you guys usually do for Conditioning and Maturation ?

    At the end of fermentation of all of my batches I usually put the beer in half temperature that the beer was in fermentation and left it at least 3 weeks cleaning up the flavor and aroma. But my question is, is there a rule of thumb for maturation ? how much time is it necessary to clean up and how it depends on the type of the beer ? what do you usually do ?
     
  2. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2017
    Messages:
    607
    Likes Received:
    888
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Controls & Instrumentation Engineer
    Location:
    Monroe, Louisiana
    Home Page:
    I "keg-condition" my beers. After primary fermentation, I transfer to a keg, add priming sugar, and store the beer at room temperature for one to four weeks depending on the style. Heavier beers condition longer.

    One advantage of this is that the beer conditions and carbonates at the same time.
     
    Marcelo_Arantes likes this.
  3. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2014
    Messages:
    528
    Likes Received:
    264
    Trophy Points:
    63
    It can vary with beer style, yeast strain, fermenting temp... But 2-4 weeks is usually plenty. Maybe really high abv beers would need more.
     
    Marcelo_Arantes likes this.
  4. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2018
    Messages:
    3,984
    Likes Received:
    7,295
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Fallon, Nevada
    For several years I left all of my beers in the fermenter for at least 3 weeks, believing that it improved them. I still believe that, if the fermentation was lacking, extended conditioning helps to reduce some of the ill affects.
    After reading a few articles from trusted sources stating that maturation is complete at the end of primary fermentation, I changed my procedure. Once the krausen drops and the beer begins to drop clear, I now cold crash for a few days and keg. I find that my ales are usually very close to their peak as soon as they are fully carbonated, which generally coincides with them becoming almost brilliant. This translates as grain to glass in about 12 to 16 days as a rule. I do fine with gelatin and quick carbonate.
    My few lagers, mostly fermented at ale temperatures, have taken a few days longer to reach the same quality.
     
  5. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,439
    Likes Received:
    9,502
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    I ferment pretty much in the same vein as Bob here pretty quick grain to glass turn arounds I recon cold crashing once FG is stable helps to speed up settling time it add a week if I couldn't crash my beer.
     
    Marcelo_Arantes and BOB357 like this.

Share This Page

arrow_white