Cold Crash in Keg?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Steve SPF, Apr 4, 2020.

  1. Steve SPF

    Steve SPF Well-Known Member

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    I want to brew again fairly quickly and have a beer fermenting just now. Usually, I would let it ferment out and leave it on the trub to cold crash for a week or so.

    Is there anything lost by getting it into kegs and under gas as soon as fermentation is complete? It would speed my process up by 7-10 days, but I don't want to damage the beer in any way.

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    My last lager i did pilsner Yurkel i pressure transfered warm (no cold crash) into recieving keg with no off side affects to my knowledge :).
    When the keg kicked a few days ago there was quite a.bit more trub at the bottom of the keg than usual.
     
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  3. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    Beer ages great in a keg. Remember that sitting on the trub does nothing for the beer, as the yeast there is flocculated out and not active.
     
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  4. Steve SPF

    Steve SPF Well-Known Member

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    Right, so might really be a good way to go? It can carb and cold crash at the same time and I can expect the first pint to be a bit murky but nothing worse? I guess I could always do a pressure transfer into a clean keg if I wanted rid of any settled out solids?

    Sounds like the way forward to me.
     
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  5. AGbrewer

    AGbrewer Active Member

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    You could always try one of these to mitigate the trub issue in your keg. Never used one, but sounds like it might be worth it.

    I've also heard of people cutting the liquid post on their kegs a little bit to ensure it doesn't pull from the absolute bottom of the keg thus eliminating or reducing the amount of trub that comes out.

    https://kegfactory.com/products/rep...8I4qBevR0-KJ_0-s9iDSILu2VvjdPlPxoCw-IQAvD_BwE
     
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  6. Steve SPF

    Steve SPF Well-Known Member

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    Wow, how clever is that? We use 'cask widge' here now which draws from the top of the cask in a very similar way to that. Very, very clever.
     
  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Then your last pint is truby. Looks like a complex solution to a first-world problem, the insidious murky first pint....
     
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  8. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    I picked up a couple of these recently and if you have a yeast that flocks well it really doesn't make much difference as I can see, but if the yeast drops slowly and you want beer now they are pretty trick. very simple to install and use too. Problem I have is if it is in a keg and chilled I think it needs sampled.
     
  9. goatee

    goatee New Member

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    carbonating AND cold crash? same time? i thought below certain temps the yeast will go dormant. cold crashing was what you did to stop ferment. i thought.

    also,, (if i may) i just finished kegging and i used priming sugar as the co2 tank is not here yet. i know this is going to take longer,, but i was wondering if i am supposed to just leave it?,, or do i need to periodically release pressure off the top? there was about 1/2-3/4 of a gallon of head space.. if the yeast continue to produce co2, dont i want to "purge" it a little to get rid of the oxygen?

    not meaning to hijack the thread but seemed quite similar topic/
     
  10. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Cold crashing is to clarify the beer, you definitely want to wait until fermentation is done to cold crash, especially if you are bottling!
     
  11. Steve SPF

    Steve SPF Well-Known Member

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    Just on that question.

    There's no reason why not by the look of it and it saves me a week or so.
     
  12. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I do it 60% of the time, sometimes i get ambitious and want to do a gelatin fine but that is less often these days.
     

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