cloudy beer ... on purpose

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by brewness, Dec 3, 2014.

  1. brewness

    brewness New Member

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    Hello , Im new at the forum, This will be my first participation here. Im from Argentina so sorry about my bad english:
    I had been searching several web sites and didn't found any answer to my concern. I like the cloudy appearance that has hefeweizen but when I brew my beer the yeast slowly decant on the bottom . I would like to have more stability in my beer. Like if you see a Paulaner or a Franziskaner, you always will see them cloudy , shake them or not. I was thinking on add some grains at the end of the mashing to generate starch haze, but from I read this may be risky because of the potential microorganisms that feeds from the starch. Someone have an idea? how does the big breweries to achieve the stable haze?
     
  2. GernBlanston

    GernBlanston New Member

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    Adding anything at the end of the mash would go on to be boiled. Problem solved.

    Don't bother with grain though, just add a bit of flour to the boil.
     
  3. brewness

    brewness New Member

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    But is not dangerous ? don't will be a potential culture to microorganisms?
     
  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    change your yeast to be low or medium flocculate or add oats or wheat, they always tend to cloud if enough is used
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    To get a nice haze in my Witbier, I add a tablespoon of wheat flour or cornstarch to the boil. In Germany, when they serve a Hefeweizen, they pour the clear beer, then rouse the yeast, then add that last bit of beer and yeast to the beer. It settles out over time. You could add the starch to the hefeweizen the same way as I add it to the Wit but you'd get starch haze, not yeast. So if you bottle your beers, pour most, rouse the yeast then add the rest to the glass. If you keg, I don't know how to rouse that yeast, sorry.
     

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