Clarity Ferm / Brewers Clarex

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by jmcnamara, Nov 1, 2016.

  1. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Anyone use this yet? it's supposed to somehow nullify the gluten in a beer without affecting the taste.

    I'll be brewing a beer for our Stache Bash in February and one of our group is allergic to gluten

    From what I've read it seems to work
     
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  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Is that that white labs product? I see my homebrew store has it for diabetics. You are a thoughtful brewer there Jmc. Anything you have to change in malt selection when brewing low sugar probably mash low?
     
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  3. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    It is. didn't know it was helpful for diabetics.
    From what little I remember reading, you don't have to change anything. just dump the stuff in, I believe during primary or secondary
    A local brewery uses it on all their beers so they can say they're gluten free or reduced. Pretty neat idea and it doesn't seem to cost much extra
     
  4. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    I posted a thread a while ago of beano brew that stuff is supposed to really ferment most residual sugars out of the beer. I'm not sure it's the same type of thing though I read it on fast ferment section on braukaiser.com
     
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  5. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    .


    WLN4100 ultra ferm whitelabs notes below.

    Brewers often want to produce light beers or dietetic beers. In these cases the brewer wants a controlled or complete hydrolysis of starch and dextrins to fermentable glucose. Traditional brewing methods permit only 75 to 80% hydrolysis of starch present in the grain raw material. Ultra-Ferm amyloglucosidase permits total hydrolysis of dextrins to fermentable glucose, from all types of starch.

    In the brewhouse, the recommended application dosage of Ultra-Ferm is 0.8 to 3.2L per ton of starch. It can be added at the beginning of the mash-in. Ultra-Ferm optimal pH is between 3.5 and 5.5. Temperature should note exceed 60°C. Amyloglucosidase activity is completely destroyed when the wort is held at 85°C for 10 minutes.[/QUOTE]
     
  6. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

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    Using that would require an extra step in my mash , mashing in at 66°C usually and never bothered with the 55 °C step
     
  7. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    #7 Trialben, Nov 2, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2016
    Yea I'm,not gunna protine rest anymore as I've herd it can kill head retention in modified malts that is anything will do a short 10 minute rest
     
  8. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    Yes I have made a Belgian Dubbel with it. I tried it on a friend who is slightly gluten in-tolerant. He just gets stomach aches and slightly swollen throat from gluten.He said he thought it was great beer. Not really any notable effects. Yellow fuzzy beer bothers him with only a small amount. I brewed 10 gal and split the batch with clariferm in one 5gal. It was a little dryer than untreated batch, less mouthfeel, but not bad. Very drinkable with still some residual sweetnes comparible with the untreated batch. In White Lab's tests it actually reduces the gluten below the FDA level to be gluten free but the FDA hasn't completed studies for them to claim that with the labeling. A government bureau dragging their feet, imagine that.
     
  9. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    cool, thanks for sharing.
    would a bit of carapils or mashing higher help to add mouthfeel? or would that be a moot point with adding the clariferm and cancel those things out?
    i've got some time before our bash, i just need to remember to pick some up at the store for a test batch
     
  10. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    I mashed at 155F so if I did it again would do 158F and also added 2# brown sugar but would eliminate any sugar additions.
    But its your beer. Maybe a Porter or Dry Stout for the stash?? So of course some carapils.

    http://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/188029/-97-trappist-dubbel
     
  11. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Much obliged.
    My mind went to a brown ale for whatever reason, maybe because I hadn't brewed one in a bit and it's fall here. The initial recipe turned out fairly well.
    Our group is mixed at best when it comes to craft beer I think, so I want to avoid anything too extreme. And I hate to say it, but I think a darker beer might fall into that category for some of them
     
  12. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    It does work well! It was originally made as a fining agent, and it worked great (White Labs gave out samples about 6 years ago at a National Conference. It got rid of chill haze completely.
    It was found that it reduced gluten substantially so that in may cases it reduced the gluten in regular beers to under 20 ppm so that they can be legally called "gluten reduced" in all places, and gluten sensitive individuals can usually have some. It is NOT gluten free, however, so I wouldn't call it gluten free just in case you have some celiacs in the crowd or a true gluten allergy. Some gluten sensitive individuals would be able to drink it, probably, but not all of them.

    It's not the same as Beano (amylase) at all.

    I did a split batch recently. It was an IPA, and 5.25 gallons got the Clarity Ferm, and 5.25 gallons did not. Otherwise, everything was identical.

    Both beers were clear, so I didn't notice greater clarity (but I never get chill haze anyway), but the interesting thing is the beers were exactly the same. Exactly, totally, completely. Body, head retention, quality of carbonation, etc. You would never be able to tell them apart.
     
  13. Yooper

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    That's ultra ferm, not clarity-ferm, a totally different product.

    Clarity ferm is added to the fermenter and has nothing to do with a mash. It can be used in extract beers.

    It is not used for breaking up the carbs, so it's not used for diabetics. It's used to reduce gluten in beer.
     
  14. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the correction of "Reduced Gluten", important point. Been a while since I did my comparison. Interesting you found no difference. With the Dubbel there was a lot going on with malts and there was a definite difference. The Clariferm beer was good but was dryer or crisper maybe? Good to hear another comparison.
     
  15. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    So, having that beer now, and I can't really tell the difference. It's maybe a little thinner than without the clarex, but it's still a fairly robust porter.

    The smell is amazing too
     
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  16. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Did your gluten intolerant mate end up having some jmcnamara?
     
  17. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like you came to the same conclusion as I did. It makes good clean beer.
    As TB asked got any testers? The friend I made it for is only slightly glut intol so it was safe for him to taste. He liked drinking real beer for a change. Not worth the chance trying it on a very intol person.
     
  18. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    She'll get to try it next weekend. I thibk she's a little more than intolerant, so here's hoping it worked
     
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  19. Bevis

    Bevis Member

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    Let us know how you'r gluten intolerant mate goes on it. My wife and kids(although too young at this stage) are celiac and has never had the joy/torture of my brews. And this will allow me to change this without having to mod my recipies too much.
     

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