"Cask" conditioninig

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Krimbos, Mar 3, 2015.

  1. Krimbos

    Krimbos Member

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    You may have seen this article in your inbox today

    http://beerandbrewing.com/VNuWYicAACQA8 ... eb3011db65

    (I like how they do not provide a link to buy them)

    My question is this - how is this any different than using a 5l mini-keg? I have used them a couple of times, and the last time my beer came out very very good. I allowed it to condition for about a month and it was perfect.

    Comments?
     
  2. UgliestLemming

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    I've seen some forum posts around using these with beer engines. Interesting idea for a classic British pub style tap
     
  3. GernBlanston

    GernBlanston New Member

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    The keg does not collapse. If you naturally carbonate in a keg, then to access it would require CO2 to push the beer out, or gravity to drain it. CO2 push negates the "cask condition" title, and a gravity drain requires venting to the atmosphere, leading to prematurely stale beer. I'm not sure how a beer engine attaches, but ventilation is required for the beer to come out.

    The collapsing container seems like a good solution for those who want true "cask conditioned " beer, but unable to consume an entire keg before it stales.

    That being said,


    It seems to me that as a home brewer, if the "Real Ale", or "Cask Conditioned" labels are that important. Why not just bottle?
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Agree with Gern: Bottle the beer instead. There's nothing magical about a cask, it's just a leaky wooden barrel that's been used so much it contributes no wood flavor but does contribute a few bacteria that hasten the aging process. And oxygen. "Casking" in a keg is just kegging beer. So unless you're going to consume quickly, bottle.
     

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