Brewing with Honey

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Hip Hops Homebrewing, Dec 30, 2015.

  1. Hip Hops Homebrewing

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    I'm planning on brewing a Honey IPA using real honey. Any suggestions on the amount I should use or how to figure that out? It will be an all grain recipe (7.5 gallon boil size and 5.5 gallon batch). Approx. 70 IBUs. I would like for it to be subtle and not over powering. Using Cacade, Amarillo, and Citra hops in boil. Will dry hop with Centennial.
     
  2. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    I brewed a honey amber (5 gallon batch) that used 1 lb of honey. It made for a great honey flavor, not overbearing. On the other hand, my Holiday Cheer has a pound of honey in it, and I really can't taste it at all. I have a lager that's not ready yet that has 2 1/2 pounds of honey. I'm interested to see how that one turns out. I'd recommend 1 or 2 pounds pounds of honey for you.
     
  3. Hip Hops Homebrewing

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    Thanks jeffpn. I have read that most homebrewers add it at flame out so as not to diminish the honey flavor during the boil. When did you add it? I plan on using Wildflower honey by the way.
     
  4. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    In both batches I think I did it at 20 minutes left. Just enough to ensure there were no contaminants, although I've read that honey is sterile.
     
  5. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    Correction: in the batch where I could distinctly taste it, I added it at 5 minutes to flame out. It was the other batch where I couldn't notice it that I added it with 20 minutes left to go.
     
  6. Hip Hops Homebrewing

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    Thanks. I am going to try adding 10-16 oz at flame out and see how it goes.
     
  7. ldh909

    ldh909 New Member

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    Probably too late to be of any help, but I brewed the "White House Honey Ale" recipe, which is one pound of honey for a 5 gallon batch. All I can say is, it tasted kind of bitter and "murky" after a month in the bottle, but it tasted really smooth at 3 months.
     
  8. Hip Hops Homebrewing

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    Thanks. I am brewing my IPA in the next few weeks. I decided to go with 1 pound of honey.
     
  9. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    Im not saying it wont taste bad but trust me actual honey in beer will not taste like honey in the final product, honey is 100% fermentable and all gets eaten by the yeast, all it does is add more alcohol, if you want to say it has honey in it just add a small amount just for kicks then use honey malt for the flavor
     
  10. ldh909

    ldh909 New Member

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    I both agree and disagree with Ozarks. Honey adds complexity of flavor (that's where I disagree), but it is subtle (that's where I agree). You'll never notice it in an IPA.
     
  11. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    I will say your right it can add a flavor just not what you would expect, I use all natural local bee hive honey from a neighboring farm so Ive never used anything commercial which is probably a different flavor all together
     

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