Bottling a Pilsner

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Duchifat, Sep 3, 2020.

  1. Duchifat

    Duchifat New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Dear Brewers,
    I am brewing my first Pilsner. So far it has fermented for 3 weeks at 11 degrees Celsius, had a 2 day diacetyl rest, been decantered and put in lagering at 3 degrees Celsius. Gravity is now 1.008. I plan to lager for about 5 weeks. My questions:
    1. When I bottle, should I add fresh yeast?
    2. At what temperature should I condition the bottled beer?
    Thanks for any advice,
    Michael
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,358
    Likes Received:
    6,586
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    1. You shouldn't need fresh yeast. There will be enough in suspension in the beer to carbonate it.
    2. Carbonate at room temperature, then store as cool as possible.
     
  3. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2017
    Messages:
    603
    Likes Received:
    884
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Controls & Instrumentation Engineer
    Location:
    Monroe, Louisiana
    Home Page:
    I agree with Nosy. I'd go with two weeks at room temperature and 3-4 weeks chilled. Two weeks should be plenty of time to carbonate.
     
    Duchifat likes this.
  4. Josh Hughes

    Josh Hughes Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2020
    Messages:
    782
    Likes Received:
    1,823
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Teacher
    Location:
    KY
    Duchifat and Blackmuse like this.
  5. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2015
    Messages:
    829
    Likes Received:
    803
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Big Lake MN
    If you lager long enough and have good flocculation of the yeast, the cell count can get pretty low. Most times there is enough yeast to carb. But if it gets super low, the bottles will take a long time to carb up. If you think you have cleared the beer to that point, one of the best yeasts to add is Nottingham. Nottingham drops really nice and forms a layer on the bottom that isn't easily disturbed.

    If the beer looks like my profile picture, add a 1/2 pack of Nottingham or even SO4. There is almost no yeast at that point.
     
    Duchifat likes this.
  6. Josh Hughes

    Josh Hughes Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2020
    Messages:
    782
    Likes Received:
    1,823
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Teacher
    Location:
    KY
    But if you bottle carb first then lager those you will have plenty of yeast for sure
     
    Duchifat likes this.
  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,358
    Likes Received:
    6,586
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    Unless you filtered it, there are still about 100,000 cells per milliliter of that beer. Plenty to carbonate.
     
    Duchifat likes this.
  8. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2015
    Messages:
    829
    Likes Received:
    803
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Big Lake MN
    Polished beers, whether filtered or naturally occurring during lagering have very little yeast. The only caveat in a lager beer that Is not filtered some yeast can be stirred up during the transfer to another vessel. Home brewers can produce polished beers. You don’t have to worry about unless the beer is perfectly clear It will carbonate, but it may take longer than a beer with a greater density of yeast. You would only add the yeast to speed up the process.
     
    Duchifat likes this.
  9. Duchifat

    Duchifat New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Nosybear, Bubba, Josh and HighVoltageMan: Thank you all for your advice!
    Michael
     
    Josh Hughes likes this.

Share This Page

arrow_white