BIAB alternatives

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Johann, Nov 2, 2017.

  1. okoncentrerad

    okoncentrerad Active Member

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    The yeast is US-04 :)

    It's cold crashing right now, since 10 hours ago, and I will let it sit there until later tonight or perhaps tomorrow. Will have a smell/tasting sample once I get it in to see if there will be any bottling done!

    Anyway, thanks everyone for putting up with my worries, much appreciated!
     
  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Leave.it there for a day or three and mix 1/2 teaspoon geletin with 80ish centegrade water 1/2 cup till dissolved then pitch this in your fermentor. Youll thank me for it;).
     
  3. okoncentrerad

    okoncentrerad Active Member

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    Well I might do that...later :) After a sample smell and taste today I've decided to give your suggestion a try!

    As I understand it, I pitch this in the fermentor straight out from the cold? Then leave it for how long? And in what temperature? Should I transfer the beer to another vessel before this to get rid of some of the junk floating around?
    I'm going to bottle my beers and I guess that mean that I have to add some yeast before I bottle?
     
  4. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    There will be plenty of viable yeast to bottle condition your beer. I never repitch when I bottle. Add about 3/4 corn sugar to a quart of water and heat until fully dissolved. Boiling, really, in case the sugar has an issue. Add that to your bottling bucket and rack your beer over that. Stir well with no sloshing. Stir again when about half of your bottles are full, in case the sugar settled
     
  5. okoncentrerad

    okoncentrerad Active Member

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    Thanks for the helpful hints! My questions though was regarding @trialbens suggestion about using gelatin to make the beer clear! :D Im a bit unsure on that process yet...
     
  6. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    You won’t remove yeast really, unless you filter it. Yeast will survive the gelatin, I’m sure. Gelatin and cold crashing aren’t part of my process, but all that I’ve seen says that yeast will remain unless you use a small enough filter to remove it. Not really done in the homebrew world.
     
  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I use gelatin frequently - enough yeast will survive to bottle condition a beer. It's a relatively easy process: Add about a half-teaspoon of unflavored gelatin powder to 2/3 cup cold water and heat to about 150 degrees, stirring to dissolve. Add the mixture to your beer and gently rock the carboy/fermentor to dissipate. It'll work in about 48 hours, you'll have bright beer! You might google "gelatin fining beer" - there are other procedures out there for fining.
     
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  8. Edan Z

    Edan Z Member

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    This thread brings back memories. I've only brewed 4 times so far. The first two times I was sure that something was wrong, only to find myself drinking great beer after a few weeks, especially after letting the carbonated bottles condition in the fridge. During my second bottling session, I seriously thought I would never brew again, thinking that I'd screwed up another batch.

    Beer is after all a fermented product, so it can look, smell and taste weird at different stages. Just stick to process, especially with all the good advice here, and 9 times out of 10 everything will turn out fine.
     
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  9. okoncentrerad

    okoncentrerad Active Member

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    Yes I'm sure you right, I've been a beer lover for 30 years or so, but this is the first time I've seen/smelled beer during all it's stages and I'm just not used to that...only the final product :D
    I'm very grateful for all the helpful people! :)
     
  10. okoncentrerad

    okoncentrerad Active Member

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    Having a sip of this Bitter I was concerned about some weeks ago. It's pretty clear, not much haze at all... I thank you guys for that advice on cold crash and gelatin, seems to have done the trick!
    Just like my first brew, the IPA, it's a bit too dry and with too little mouth feel, and this one also have some kind of background taste that shouldn't be there. But it's my own brew, and my second one...so I can have oversee that, for this time :D It's drinkable, no doubt about that. 20171208_201834.jpg
     
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