Beer was Carbonated in a keg then bottled

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Fat Duck Brewery, Oct 6, 2020.

  1. Fat Duck Brewery

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    Hi All,
    I ran an experiment with a selection of different home brews, all brewed on my BM20, fermented 2 two weeks, then carbonated in a keg and left for a couple of week.
    All drank good off the keg, so I then used my bottle gun and bottled a selection, a stout, blond, IPA.

    Now when I was drinking these from the bottle, early on they all were good none of them were over gassy
    But after a few months all of the beers have become overly gassy in the bottle? but why?

    I dont understand what has caused this, the stout was terrible until you knocked the gas back out of it.

    thanks

    craig
     
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  2. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Did you purge the bottles with Co2 first?
     
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  3. Fat Duck Brewery

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    Yes I always purge the bottle, do you think i’ve been heavy handed, and this goes into the beer after time?
     
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  4. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    No, Co2 is what you want in the headspace, it is oxygen you need to avoid.
    I might expect "grassy" to come from leaving hop debris in the beer too long.
    Others who are more experienced and knowledgeable will no doubt have comments and questions to help you.
    Curious why you would bottle from the keg. I mostly keg, and when I do bottle, I add priming sugar and then bottle condition.
     
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  5. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    So maybe your beer was stored cooler in the keg than when in the bottle sooo the co2 kept in the solution went into the bottles headspace causing over carbonation of sorts.

    Or beers wernt fully attenuated which is hard to believe after 2 weeks in fermentor across the board.

    Cool exbeeriment worth I think as is my approach when I go mobile and also most common method of sharing my hombrew and never know how it's going to be treated once it leaves my possesion.
     
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  6. Fat Duck Brewery

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    Thanks,

    Thats a good point, over the beers all getting warmer, as I have moved house and they weren't anymore in my fridge, and it was a warm summer. This could of been the cause.
    As my beer which sits happily in its keg, and in the kegerator I built, was fine.

    I feel the need for another exbeeriment ;-)
     
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  7. Fat Duck Brewery

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    Generally I keg my beer, as like many people, got a bit fed up with all the bottling work and cleaning. Much easier just pulling a fresh beer from a tap. But when I want to give some of my beers to friends, I naturally bottle it from the keg, and its already nicely carbonated.
    I had a pack of different beers and i left them all out of the fridge for a few months, and now I'm drinking them, I found them all to be overly gassy, knock the excess gas off them and they still taste fine though. They are now all drunk..
     
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  8. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    That's a bit odd since you wouldn't have any more CO2 in the beer than it had in the keg. One thing you can do when bottling off the keg is disconnect the CO2 line and bleed the tank before you transfer to bottles. That will offgas some of the pressure and might help.
     
  9. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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    I'm wondering if some additional fermentation didn't happen being in warmer temps.
     
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  10. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    My guess, or "hop creep", or infection. Can't have more in the bottle than came out of the keg otherwise.
     
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  11. Fat Duck Brewery

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    They were four different beer types, and I always do two weeks fermenting and check if the gravity is holding at the end.
    Then I keg, carbonate and leave for a few weeks.
    Only then, and I'm a month further on do I bottle one of two. So for all to still be fermenting or infected seems a bit unlikey I hope.
    Plus they all still tasted fine, after you knocked the fizz out of them ;-)

    They did sit outside a cooling for a few months during summer. So a beer mystery maybe.
     
  12. Fat Duck Brewery

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    Thanks
     
  13. Fat Duck Brewery

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    We'll never know, a strange one indeed.
     
  14. YaleH

    YaleH Member

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    That was going to be my guess, and most likely what happened.... Has all the makings of a secondary fermentation due to warmer temps. I've purchased beers from breweries and they cautioned about making sure they stay cold because they have had some issues of it happening.
     

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