Batch not fermenting out

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Bulldog, Feb 24, 2014.

  1. Bulldog

    Bulldog New Member

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    I brewed two batches of Kolsch back to back with the same ingredients, Starting OG was 1.058, one fermented down to 1.014 like it is suppose to, but the other stopped at 1.022. I have pitched more yeast, oxygenated and pitched more yeast but it will not ferment any more. Is this just a bad batch......could someone tell me what happen?
     
  2. Foster82

    Foster82 New Member

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    Were your mash temps the same? If there was a significant difference, it could account for the different FG
     
  3. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    if you re-pitch, treat it like the beginning of fermentation, it will take a few days to get started, you could add some nutrient and or sugar too
     
  4. dave althouse

    dave althouse Member

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    no fermentation activity

    Brewed a batch on Saturday, there is no evidence of any fermentation, just sitting there. Shook it yesterday. using wyeast 1010 American Ale 58-70, carboy sitting on the back porch at 65 degrees. Should I buy another pack of yeast and repitch? Will there be any affect on the wort with no fermentation, how long can the wort set there with no activity and still be OK

    davealthouse
     
  5. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    a fermentation that has really stopped has no krausen or foam and no bubbles coming up and the gravity is much higher than it should be

    a stuck fermentation could just be the krausen or foam has sealed the top layer and no co2 is able to come up, that doesn't mean its not fermenting

    or yeast fell asleep and dropped to the bottom from up and down temperature changes, moving the carboy around or just weak lazy yeast

    first try adding a cup of sugar, shake up the carboy and keep it on the warmer side like 68 -70 and wait for foam, if you see foam leave it alone. if nothing happens shake it up and add another packet of yeast

    it won't harm the beer unless too much yeast is still floating around when you bottle or keg, then you have to let it sit for a week or more
     
  6. Del Dragon

    Del Dragon New Member

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    Hello,
    I know it is an old post, but I wish to commnet because this week happend to my some similar thing.
    All my batchs allways start to makes bubbles around 10 hours after pitching. This time I used for fist time a Bry-97 yeast, and after 24hs nothing happend. I was really worry about it, thinking maybe I kill the yeast. Then I read a lot of post, and they says sometimes the fermentetion start 72 hours after pitching. Then I wait, and a the 36 hour, the bubbles come out.
    I think maybe it´s just a matter of time, we most wait a don´t worries.

    Cheers!
     
  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Remember this mantra: Relax, don't worry, have a home brew. Yeast have been doing their job for ten thousand years. They know what they're doing. If you have a sugary wort, you aerated and you didn't kill your yeast somehow - it's harder than most think - you will eventually have fermentation. And about the only way you can kill your yeast is if you added Campden tablets to your wort by mistake, perhaps thinking it was yeast nutrient, or you pitched way too hot, above 105 degrees.
     

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