All Grain Temp Questions

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by MrBIP, Nov 27, 2013.

  1. MrBIP

    MrBIP Active Member

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    So, before I ever brewed batch one with steeping grains and extract, I learned, DO NOT steep or mash above 170 degrees; you'll extract tannins, and while some tannins are appropriate in wine, they sure wouldn't be a nice enhancement to your beer!

    Now I'm getting into all grain (awesome!), which leads me to read about such things as decoction. So the question is: how is ok to boil part of your mash, but mashing or steeping over 170 is sure disaster as that tannins will be released? (same thing in stepping, adding boiling water to raise mash temp, obviously well above that 170 mark..??).

    What am I missing?
     
  2. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    In short, PH.
    Tannins are extracted by a number of factors.
    Temperature,improper crush and or incorrect PH.
    An AG batch with a decoction typically starts with a low water to grist ratio. It also starts at an acid rest or protein rest temperature. The rests and lower ratio will help bring the mash into a proper PH range. This allows a decoction without extracting tannins.
    I'm sure Kaiser can give you a much better, in depth response, but this should give you a basic understanding.
    Brian
     
  3. Tom McLean

    Tom McLean New Member

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    The whole thing is not simple chemistry. If you have a chance, read what Noonan has to say about decoction mashing in his book on lager beer. The decoction procedure assures that tannins are not extracted. It also assures that the beer has many other dersirable properities, not produced by an infusion mash. One day soon, I plan to make a Boch using decoction mashing.
     
  4. TheZel66

    TheZel66 Member

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    Forget about decoction... not really needed unless you're bored with infusion mashing. You can make great beer without it. There's so many malts out there today that can give you the same flavor results with a single infusion.
     
  5. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

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    yes you can also over flavor your beer by accident using the same grain you normally would with infusion by doing decoction, Ive recently done that very thing and had to filter one keg just to thin the flavor down lol I like to drink beer not sip it
     

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