Adding dark malts later in the mash for a Black IPA

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by TheDopeGodfather, May 9, 2020.

  1. TheDopeGodfather

    TheDopeGodfather New Member

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    Can you guys help me determine the pros and cons of adding my dark malts later in the mash for a Black IPA?

    Here's my thoughts. I've got a Black IPA recipe with 2-row, Victory Malt, Caramel 60, Chocolate Malt, and a dark Carafa Special. I'm thinking of adding the last two to the mash after mashing the other grains for thirty minutes. I'm thinking if I add them later I will get a lot of the color, but less of their dark roasty flavors.

    I am shooting for a Black IPA that is focused more on the hops and less on the dark malts. But I really want the darkest color possible.

    Is this something that might work, or would I just blow my efficiency and make a beer that doesn't taste how I want?
     
  2. philjohnwilliams

    philjohnwilliams Well-Known Member

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    When I make a stout I add the dark grains at the end of the mash. I stir them in and the recirculate for 10 minutes, I get all the colour with a bit less harshness. The main readon I do it if I add the dark grains at the beginning of the mash the mash pH goes too low. Adding them at the end lets the rest of the mash convert at the proper pH, .
     
  3. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    I "cap the mash" on my black IPA with 5% duhsked carafa III as described above, stir it in and recirc for 10 minutes. Last time I took pictures as the wort went from light to dark.
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  4. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Black IPA is not really a new thing, it was originally called "Cascadian Black Ale"
     
  5. TheDopeGodfather

    TheDopeGodfather New Member

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    That's exactly what I was thinking. Glad to see it's working for other folks. Is your OG different than what the recipe calculators say it will be because you're only including those malts for a short time?
     
  6. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    This is a recipe that I copied from another BF member AnteK. Other than altering the hops, I haven't changed much, if anything. The carafa III is checked off as a late addition. The other key ingredient is some simple sugar to thin it out a bit. The original recipe had dark belgian candi sugar (syrup actually), I could probably just add any simple sugar, but I have continued to use what was prescribed. Candi sugar goes in near the end of the boil. Here is the recipe if you are interested, my beer snob friends look at me with that, "dude, you seriously made this?" look as they are drinking it.
    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/723308/resurrection-black-ipa
     
  7. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    You would not miss much in OG unless you are using a lot of chocolate and carafa.
    NOTE - Carafa special is known for providing color without harsh bitterness. - You can keep it in the mash from the start. If you are using pale chocolate malt then you can mash the whole time too as it is not as bitter either.

    It would be a different story if it were black patent malt or roasted barely. Those I would sprinkle on the mash just before sparging.

    My 2 cents: Mash all of it for a Black IPA as is - I like how the malts in a black IPA play with the hops (I don't really like IPAs though).
     
  8. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    It sounds like the correct move for what you're after, but I'd sooner do <unintelligible> with an <unintelligble> and some olive oil than cut down the roast flavours in my hoppy black. But that's just me.

    You could also look at Sinamar. It's an extract of Carafa malts from Weyerman. Haven't used it myself so no ideas on dosage or if it is as neutral as claimed.
     
  9. Frankenbrewer

    Frankenbrewer Well-Known Member

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    I make one at least twice a year. I BIAB and I use Blackprinz to avoid the harshness
     
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  10. Steve Ruch

    Steve Ruch Member

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    You can also cold steep your dark grains overnight the day before brewing to get color and not much roastiness.
     

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