Do you pull a high krausen hop addition when doing a DDH?

Semper Sitientem

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I’m going to try and clone a NEIPA from a Georgia brewery who gave me the malt bill and hop list, but not the hop schedule (I think if they did they’d have to kill me). So, I’m left to figuring it out myself. I’m going to add two hop additions - one at high krausen and the other around day 11, three days before bottling. My question is, do I pull the HK hops after a period of time or do I leave them until bottling. The interweb has conflicting info. as usual so just curious about what this group thinks.
 
I found that dry hopping during active fermentation was not as effective as I expected. I make one large addition near the end of fermentation. That and one large whirlpool addition, 80C for about 20 minutes. I also use VOSS for a fast fermentation at 39C. Once the hops start to fall out I reduce the temperature to serving temp, then keg and serve.
 
I'll do one, that's around 20-30% of the dry hop amount at high krausen and add the rest just before terminal. I don't remove the first addition.

I generally split when it's a big dry hop, not due to some hop/yeast interaction during active fermentation. While I'm convinced that those changes happen, I'm not that sure it makes enough of a difference for me to change my process for smaller dry hops. I'll also try and schedule the hops that have fewer higher volatile compounds for the first dry hop and leave the more volatile ones for the later dry hop. I'll use something like this https://tools.yakimachief.com/docs/Survivable-Compounds-Poster.pdf to work out what should go in earlier than later.
 
I agree. Although biotransformotion is a scientific fact, I’m not sure I can perceive any differences.
Speaking from my experience, I would honestly argue that biotransformation may not be what it is cracked up to be.
I was getting disappointing aroma results dry hopping during peak, or highly active fermentation.
The hop aroma coming from the fermenter was phenomenal when doing this.
It occurred to me that all of that aroma being vented into my garage space was being wasted.
Switching to one large "late in fermentation" addition, made a VERY, VERY perceivable difference in my glass.
 
So yes, add the hops as described, no need to remove the hk addition. Worst case: it will be beer.
 
Speaking from my experience, I would honestly argue that biotransformation may not be what it is cracked up to be.
I was getting disappointing aroma results dry hopping during peak, or highly active fermentation.
The hop aroma coming from the fermenter was phenomenal when doing this.
It occurred to me that all of that aroma being vented into my garage space was being wasted.
Switching to one large "late in fermentation" addition, made a VERY, VERY perceivable difference in my glass.
I found this to the case for me. I don't brew NEIPA's, but I do like a fruity pale ale and IPA. I tried get some biotransformation by doing a dry hop during fermentation, but it didn't seem to work. I see the advantages of dry hopping during fermentation with oxygen ingress reduced, but I never got the flavors and aromas some were getting from it.
 

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