Wyeast 1187 Ringwood

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Frankenbrewer, Feb 26, 2021.

  1. Frankenbrewer

    Frankenbrewer Well-Known Member

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    Anyone used this yeast? If so, then what type of beer did you brew with it and what was your results?
     
  2. dmtaylor

    dmtaylor Active Member

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    Several things:

    1) No I have not used it. From everything I hear, it is very fruity and prone to a lot of diacetyl. And this is probably because...

    2) It is actually genetically a pastorianus lager yeast, not a cerevisiae ale yeast. This was recently discovered in October 2019. Not that this matters, because of course, everybody everywhere uses it to make English "ales". Just sayin', that's why it makes diacetyl that won't quit.

    3) My notes say that it is a very fast fermenter, and very flocculent, with average apparent attenuation of about 71%. All these are nice good things in my opinion. Linky:

    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/16XRUloO3WXqH9Ixsf5vx2DIKDmrEQJ36tLRBmmya7Jo/edit?usp=sharing

    Please try it, and let us know how it turns out. Cheers.
     
  3. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    #3 HighVoltageMan!, Feb 26, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2021
    This list is really good and confirms much of what experience in brewing with different yeasts. Specifically, I was trying to find out more information about Wyeast 2124. The spreadsheet (which is awesome, by the way) doesn't show it is a Weihenstaphan strain as Kristen England suggests. Wyeast describes it as "Carlsberg in origin" and names it Bohemian Lager. The problem with KE's suggestion that it's a Weihenstaphan yeast (34/70 and TUM 34) is that Carlberg and Bohemian type yeasts are type 1 or Saaz lager strains and 34/70/TUM 34 are type 2 or Frohberg strains. So who to believe? Wyeast or Kristen England? The other problem is that nearly everyone references Kristen England's work and it's everywhere, it seems to add to the confusion.

    I use dry 34/70 and Wyeast 2124 and they are both very different yeasts. 2124 acts more like a Saaz strain, lower flocculation, more malt character, quick starter and lower temperature tolerate. Fermentis 34/70 doesn't tolerate the cold as well, starts slower, is dryer and flocculates like crazy, makes a great American lager (as your spreadsheet suggests).

    I been looking for these genome studies in regard to specific strains, especially with lager yeasts in mind. Thanks again for this spreadsheet, it's another piece to the puzzle I'm trying to solve.

    BTW, S04 is NOT the same as WLP007 (KE). But I didn't need a genome study to prove it, just brew with both, not even close.

    Sorry to hijack this thread.
     
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  4. dmtaylor

    dmtaylor Active Member

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    To continue the hijack... genetically, 2124 is about the same as... WLP029 Kolsch! Which is NOT an ale yeast at all, but pastorianus.

    And W-34/70 is closest to 2035 American Lager.

    KE's stuff is sorely outdated, superseded by real science.

    Cheers.
     
  5. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    Thanks again! I do believe 029 is a lager strain, not really surprising. But the genetic likeness to 2124 is a little puzzling because 029 is a huge acid producer and 2124 is not. So I would guess that the genetics tell only part of the story.

    Cheers!
     
  6. dmtaylor

    dmtaylor Active Member

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    I haven't tasted high acid from WLP029. I haven't measured pH, but never noticed anything odd about it. Makes great beer, at any fermentation temperature IMO.

    [/hijack]
     
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  7. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    #7 HighVoltageMan!, Feb 26, 2021
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2021
    Ph of the finish beer of 029 fermented at recommended temperatures was 3.9-4.0. 2124 consistently ends up at 4.3-4.4. I check finish pH in beer when I try new yeasts. Anal retentive I guess.
     
  8. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

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    For what its worth, I refer to your table all the time. Thanks for this, much appreciated.
     
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  9. Frankenbrewer

    Frankenbrewer Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the table. I'm just in research mode right now but I let you all know when if I use that yeast.
     
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  10. Rhys33

    Rhys33 New Member

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    Yes, I've used Ringwood a few times, but not recently. Used in pales, browns and porters. It worked quite well for me, producing pleasant malt and yeast flavors and I didn't experience the stall effect that some brewers report. It's not a stand-out favorite of mine, but I wouldn't hesitate to use it again.
     
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