What if the yeast doesn't take?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by blackcats, May 22, 2018.

  1. blackcats

    blackcats New Member

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    #1 blackcats, May 22, 2018
    Last edited: May 23, 2018
    OK I'll throw out my first question on this forum to show how much of a noob I am, haha.
    I've got a Kolsch currently in secondary (still VERY cloudy) and I just boiled a 5 gal. batch of Brewer's Best Weisenbier last night.
    more: dự án sun láng hạ
    I checked in on the Weisenbier this morning, I'm at 63F and I saw absolutely no bubbling in the airlock yet.
    However, that was only 10 hours in after transferring to the Primary.
    I'm trying to adjust up to 66F or so.
    I expect it to be bubbling away this evening or tomorrow morning, but it did make me wonder --
    What happens if the yeast doesn't do it's job, and I check my gravity in a day or two and nothing has happened?
    more: tasco xuân phương liền kề
    Can you re-pitch at this point, or is is a ruined batch?
    (I used the dry yeast packet they provided 'Lallemand Munich' and I did not rehydrate per their instructs. I plan to get two packets next time and attempt to rehydrate, but baby steps...
    more: dự án sun láng hạ
     
  2. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

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    watch it for about 7 days, if gravity hasn't changed then pitch fresh yeast, check the best by date on the yeast.
     
  3. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    They say not to rehydrate because people tend to kill the yeast with water that is too hot. Be careful, and don’t waste your money on a second pack of yeast. Just use one pack for lower gravity beers.
     
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  4. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Relax everything will be fine. Youve done your part now let them do theirs.
     
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  5. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    As stated above, relax. First, don't use air lock activity as an indication of fermentation, especially if you're fermenting in a bucket. Bucket lids don't always seal well. Second, you're panicking way too soon. Give the yeast a chance to ramp into the active phase. 36 hours is about when you begin to worry. If, after that, you are concerned you can lift the lid enough to see if krausen has formed without ruining your beer. 90% chance that you've got nothing to worry about. As hard as we may try to screw up brewing, yeast tries harder to make beer.
     
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  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    If it has sugar and oxygen, the yeast will do its job, which is to procreate and make more yeast. It's very difficult to kill enough of them in pitching to have no fermentation whatsoever. Longer lag times aren't necessarily signs of trouble so a little patience is the prescription at this point.
     
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  7. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    The longest I've waited was 3 days for activity so it's way to soon to panic. And worst case pitch a dry pack of US-05 or whatever in and let it buck. Odds are within 24 hours you'll have something going on, but relying on the airlock isn't a good idea as my fermonster airlock never bubbles as it doesn't have a very good lid seal.
     
  8. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Also, carboy bungs can leak gas, resulting in a complete fermentation with no airlock activity. The most reliable way to ensure you have fermentation going, and you likely do, is through gravity readings. If the gravity is dropping from one reading to the next, it's fermenting, bubbles or not, krauesen or not.
     
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  9. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    It's always a good idea to keep a standby dry yeast in the fridge. US-05 or Nottingham seem to be popular choices. If you confirm that fermentation hasn't started within 36 hours pitch the standby. I know many would say to wait longer, but that would take a certain amount of confidence in your sanitation practices.

    Beyond that, what's flying around in the air while you're chilling? Not sure, but I attribute a lot of my good fortune to the fact that I live in the high desert and believe that there are fewer bugs in this climate. Ten plus years without any infected beers. Bees and cotton from cottonwood trees, which I worried about for a time, don't seem to be a problem.
     
  10. Vallka

    Vallka Well-Known Member

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    RDWHAHB
     
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