ways to lower FG on a lager / pilsner. first attempt came out too sweet

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Brewer #334545, Jan 9, 2021.

  1. Brewer #334545

    Brewer #334545 New Member

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    Hey Everyone,
    i attempted my first pseudo-lager/pils back in november and it came out way too sweet.

    the recipe was something like:
    10lbs Pils
    2lbs Flaked rice
    90 min @ 150 degF
    .5 Oz hallertau trad @ 60
    .5 Oz tettinger @ 60
    1 pk Krispy Kviek fermented at 25 degC


    fg was 1.014 and OG was something like 1.058 there about

    it came out way too sweet.

    i tried to do a bit of research on the topic, and from what i can gather the only real way to get FG below 1.010 seems to be the use of amylase enzyme.

    I know if I had a better attenuating yeast it would help but i don't think it would be good enough to get me under 1.010
    i will be using white lab pilsner yeast on a 2L starter this time around.

    any words of the wise?

    i ended up ordering a bag of barn owl 2-row pale ale malt instead of normal 2 row by accident but my plan is to hammer out some lagers and NEIPAs with it.

    thanks,
    -Will
     
  2. Steelyace

    Steelyace New Member

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    What temperature/temperatures did you it ferment at? And I think you are on the right track with the 2L starter. Lagers need a large starter of health yeast to assure you get a clean fermentation, to help reduce off flavors and to get the attenuation you need/want. For a 5 gallon batch 2L should be plenty, but don't be scared of a little more even.
     
  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I'd just use a trusted lager yeast. Obviously you got the low end of the advertised 70-82 percent attenuation range. A basic dry yeast like S-23 will routinely give around 80% attenuation. I've gotten lagers to go over 80% which is what you need to get from near 1.06 OG to 1.010 FG. You don't need amylase to do that.
     
  4. Brewer #334545

    Brewer #334545 New Member

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    Steelyace, 25C ~77F should of kept units the same.

    okay thanks for the tip J A.

    -Will
     
  5. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    1.058 is a little high for a pilsner, usually they are 1.048-50. A lower OG will help with the sweetness. The second thing is to mash at a lower temperature. 90 minutes is common for German beers, but the temperature is typically 145F. The rice doesn’t always help with attenuation, surprisingly it doesn’t seem to help with sweetness. The sweetness is a combination of mash temperatures, bitterness, water treatment and yeast attenuation. 34/70 at 62F will attenuate up to 85%. German beers are sweet in the middle of the taste, bit dry on the finish.

    Wyeast 1007 is also a great yeast for mock pilsners, it’s malty , but dry.
     

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