Water chemistry profile......what to do? I’m lost!

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Brewer #128484, Feb 5, 2019.

  1. Brewer #128484

    Brewer #128484 New Member

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    I had my water tested by Ward Labs, but I have no idea on how to interpret or where to begin adjustment. My goal is to brew different styles of beer. Milk stouts, IPAs and saison. I’d appreciate any suggestions.

    In ppm

    Ph 7.7
    Ca- 40
    Mg-5
    Na- 57
    S-4
    Cl- 87
    Total Alk, caco3- 88
    Carbonate- <1
    Bicarbonate, hco3- 107
    Total hardness, caco3- 121
     
  2. wallyLOZ

    wallyLOZ New Member

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    Check out the Basic Water Chemistry calculator, link below. Just started dabbling with water profiles a couple of months ago myself. It's a whole new ball game.

    https://www.brewersfriend.com/water-chemistry/

    Also get a copy of Palmer and Kaminski's book: Water, A comprehensive guide for brewers.

    Good luck and let us know of your progress.
     
    Medarius likes this.
  3. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    You have pretty good water (looks a lot like our tap water here in Aurora, CO). You'll need a bit of calcium for the IPAs and Saisons - I'd use gypsum to get it (about 2-4 grams/5 gallon batch should suffice). Since this is a beginner forum, I'd add a half-teaspoon full of gypsum and call it good.
     
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  4. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    I agree with above. I see you have noted the pH level. As you research you will learn that your starting pH isn't something that you need to worry about, it does not have a direct affect on mash or beer pH. Read through the 3 part series on water in the blog section here a couple, or a few times. It is a lot to digest, refer back to it as you brew more batches and learn about it as you go. Once you start to grasp it, you will find that it really isn't all that complicated.
    Cheers, and good luck,
    Craigerrr
     
  5. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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  6. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I'd follow Nosy's suggestion until you're more comfortable with the rest of your process. Trying to cover to many bases at once stressed me right out when I was first starting.
     
  7. Ward Chillington

    Ward Chillington Well-Known Member

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    In the for what it's worth column, I have been brewing for just over a year now and here's where I go my basic understanding of water. Go find the 3 podcasts on Brew Strong that Palmer and Jamil did on water chemistry and listen to it about 4 times. There are also images of John Palmer's nomagraphs (sp??) that you can google. Looking at one of these as he describes how to use it was a real help for me in figuring out just what beers my water was best suited without any treatment and finally...balance of a 3 legged chair!

    From what I have gathered so far with this element of beer, it's a deep subject ( see what I did there??:rolleyes:) but having just a basic grasp of the subject can make a big difference.
     

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