volume of a pound of grain

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Benman IPA, Nov 15, 2018.

  1. Benman IPA

    Benman IPA Member

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    Hey All,
    im working on upgrading my gear and looking for a new kettle
    i need your help to find a calculator that gives the volume of the water and the grains together
    or if you have a suggestion for the size of kettle good for 5G BIAB batch
    Thanks
    BenMan
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Ten gallons. Don't even need a calculator.
     
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  3. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    Yep. Twice the batch volume is what you need for BIAB.
     
  4. Benman IPA

    Benman IPA Member

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    thank you for the prompt reply
    According to BF calculator it takes 7.5G of water and 17 lb of grains for a batch of a Triple -
    I'm not sure that 10G will be enough
     
  5. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    If there's one on the site, I'm not familiar with it. There are other calculators available, but I end up using this one:
    https://www.rackers.org/calcs.shtml
    There's a "can I mash it?" calculator there that'll give you volume for x lbs grain at y qts/lb. Used in conjunction with the mash calculator here it'll help you with hypothetical mash volumes in terms of planning.
    If you get your equipment profile set up, the "water requirements" section of the Brew Log will tell you if you're over the limit of your mash tun. You have to use your total mash thickness in the "starting mash thickness" box on the recipe calculator because there seems to be a glitch that makes the water requirements section of the brew log grab that figure rather than calculating from total volume entered in the mash section.
     
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  6. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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  7. Benman IPA

    Benman IPA Member

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    thank you J A, that calculator looks like what I need. I beleive i have to use the thickness based on the water requirements for the BIAB and the grain bill.
    thank you so much!
    BenMan
     
  8. Benman IPA

    Benman IPA Member

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  9. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    x2 on the Manskirt site, too. Plenty of useful calculators there.
     
  10. Beer_Pirate

    Beer_Pirate Active Member

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  11. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

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    the general rule is the kettle is twice the size of any batch of beer
     
  12. Beer_Pirate

    Beer_Pirate Active Member

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    I use a 10 gallon ketlle for BIAB. When I run into this issue I usually mash in with 1-1.5 gallons less than full volume and then run it through the grains after I take them out. Takes a little more effort than regular BIAB but it's not too bad.
     
  13. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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  14. Benman IPA

    Benman IPA Member

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    i do the same but want to change to a one step infusion, however, based on the calculators i should use a 14G kettle for high gravity batches - i believe it is too big for my setting
    i think i will adopt the 2X system and go with a 10G kettle and continue with the extra step if i need more volume.
    thank you
     
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  15. Benman IPA

    Benman IPA Member

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    thank you all for your help!
    BenMan
     
  16. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Mine's 11 gallons, my default batch size is 6. Since I generally do a 90-minute boil (at 6,000' elevation, the extra time is to ensure DMS boil-off), I need 7.5 gallons in the kettle. Sometimes I use a 120 minute boil, meaning an 8-gallon start. But I haven't boiled over with the 11-gallon kettle, at least not yet.
     

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