Using a Starter from a previous batch

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by metalnerdsolid, May 7, 2018.

  1. metalnerdsolid

    metalnerdsolid New Member

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    As I said on my other thread, I'm currently brewing a Belgian Dubble. The yeast I used was a Belgian Abbey 1214 from Wyeast. Next I plan on doing an Irish Red (Irish 1084). Can I use the leftover yeast as a starter for the Irish Red? The yeast calculator shows over saturation so that's a concern. Should I scrape some out? Will it change the flavor of my Irish Red?
    Sorry to be such a noob. I have a ton of questions.
     
  2. KC

    KC Active Member

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    It's normal to pitch a new batch onto a yeast cake without washing. There are a couple general points:
    • Leftover trub leaves an impact on the next batch. Go with an equal to darker color; equal to higher IBU; similar styles
    • Yeast can mold over if it sits too long. Re-pitch as quickly as possible
    • Yeast cake adds volume to the fermenter. Account for that so you don't have a blowout
    1214 is one of my favorite strains, but it is not style correct for an Irish red. It's also a considerable jump going from a dubbel. Nothing wrong with trying it anyway. 1214 can be very active so keep an eye on the krausen or set it up with a blowoff tube if the gravity is high
     
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  3. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I pitched a Russian Imperial Stout onto a ESB yeast cake and it worked fine. It had twice the trub layer when it finished but otherwise it wasn't an issue.

    It could change the flavour admittedly but I don't think it's a huge concern. Worst case you could swirl out a liter of yeast cake and pitch that in. It'll have plenty of yeast in it but much less left over material from the Dubbel.

    I had a lot of these same questions this time last year so don't stress to hard about it.
     
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  4. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Better to use your big pitch of Belgian yeast on a Quad or something. Any beer using Trappist yeast isn't going to be remotely Irish even though the pitch size may limit ester and phenol production that would give it the Belgian flavor.
    The concept is sound, though. I routinely make a small batch of mid-gravity beer or regular batch of low-gravity beer as a starter for a double batch or a big beer. RIS is a perfect example of using a cake for a big beer. Pale or Blonde ale first and Double IPA would be another good iteration. Generally overpitching won't cause much in the way of problem and lagers in particular benefit from an oversized pitch.
     
  5. metalnerdsolid

    metalnerdsolid New Member

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    I reconsidered my next batch and decided to do a hefeweizen using the same hops I got for the Belgian (Styrian Goldings and Saaz). What is the consensus on using the yeast cake from the Belgian for the Hefeweizen?
     
  6. metalnerdsolid

    metalnerdsolid New Member

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    Also, I can't stand high IBU beers lol. IPAs are never gonna be an option.
     
  7. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    IPAs aint necessarily high in bitterness if brewed well the malt should compliment the high bitterness from large quantities of hops used its all about when u add them:).
     
  8. metalnerdsolid

    metalnerdsolid New Member

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    Guess I can use the brewing calculator to get an idea about how high the IBU would be. Much more than 30 or 40 and I just lose interest.o_O
     
  9. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    wheat beers and lagers then;).
    IBUs are weird i think i recently brewed my highest IBU beer to date 80+ibu (according to calculator) and doesnt seem overly bitter.
     
  10. berenkaya

    berenkaya New Member

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    leather jackets are the perfect item to wear for this time period but let me tell you a little secret.They are perfect year round.don't be afraid to invest in thered leather jacket motorcyclebecause i promise you'll get your money's worth.
     
  11. KC

    KC Active Member

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    It will taste more like a Belgian wheat than German. The combination would make a nice summer sipper to go with your red leather jacket.
     
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  12. KC

    KC Active Member

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    There's enough IPA's out there you don't need to be adding any more. The hoppiest I'll brew is a ~35 IBU English Bitter, and I do that for the wonderful bready malts. It's way more fun brewing malty beers.
     
  13. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Yeast is very specific to style. Belgian yeasts give you Belgian beers (there is plenty of variation but fruity, clovey flavor is common) Hefe yeast gives you Hefeweizen. English yeast gives you Bitters and Stouts. American Ale yeasts give you IPAs and Pales. If you're starting with a Belgian yeast, you're going to brew a Belgian beer, nothing else. If you want a different beer, choose a different yeast.
     
  14. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Or roll with it and see what happens. I bet it will taste fine, if not to style.
     
  15. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    You'll get a Belgian wheat beer. But I agree, roll with it.
     
  16. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Yes, that...but don't expect a Hefeweizen if you're not using a Hefe yeast.
     

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