Using 2L Plastic Soda Bottles

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by steamyb, Jun 5, 2015.

  1. steamyb

    steamyb New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2013
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Kernersville, NC
    I'm downsizing and will be unable to make my 10/15 Gallon batches. Also, the kegerator, keezer and 14 kegs will have to go. I will go back to the turkey cooker and 5 gallon batches, where I started. I'm wondering if anyone is using 2L soda bottles for beer? I use 2L bottles for hard cider and freeze them to make Applejack (drained into a 1/2 gallon jug). I hate bottling, which is what started the kegging in the first place. So, about 11/12 of the 2L soda bottles will hold 5 gallons and I can just pop some into the fridge as needed. 2L equals 4.23 Pints. Anyone doing this?
     
  2. GernBlanston

    GernBlanston New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    317
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I once used some 1 liter plastic bottles to make it easier to ship in a package. The guy at the other end said it tasted OK. I don't know why they wouldn't work as they can hold the pressure. Don't use, as I tried once, bottles that are not intended for pressure, like some iced tea bottles. the bottom will blow out.



    The only problem for me would be, I don't drink 2 liters at a time. You could re seal with one of those carb caps that allow you to put CO2 pressure in the bottle. But then you got to have a CO2 cylinder, and then why not just keg?
     

    Attached Files:

  3. steamyb

    steamyb New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2013
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Kernersville, NC
    True- tea bottles and water bottles are very thin and can not hold carb pressure. I was thinking a soda will hold carb for several days in the fridge, why not beer? And 4 pints is basically 2 nights drinking for me. I think it will work, Coopers bottles are 750 ml and use 2 carb drops. I'm thinking 4 carb drops for a 2L should work. I could split it and do half with 4 carb drops, and half with 5. Whatcha think?
     
  4. GernBlanston

    GernBlanston New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    317
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Soda bottles should hold the pressure nicely. If you don't mind drinking from them, then I don't see a problem. They travel well to the beach, if that's your thing. Also the bottle will get firm when under pressure, something you can feel, as opposed to glass.
     
  5. steamyb

    steamyb New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2013
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Kernersville, NC
    The bottles will just be for storage and transport. Home brew (or any craft brew, for that matter) should only be enjoyed from a glass. That way the nose can pick-up the hops and the taste is ten-fold. IMHO
    Funny, but now that I am drinking great beers- I drink less than when I drank Natty-lite. I guess 40 years of drinking watered down piss has caused me to slow down and enjoy the greatest beverage made by man. And the varieties available to us, it is true- 'anyone who says they don't like beer, just hasn't had the right beer'.
    Thanks for the response, I feel better about letting the equipment go. Making beer is cheap- cooling, storing, and dispensing are what cost me. My son and I made 15 gallons of Pale Ale yesterday for a total cost of $57.51 or $19.17/keg. We started at 3:40 and were finished at 7:30- clean up included. What a great hobby!
    Style OG FG ABV IBU SRM
    American Pale Ale 1.040-1.055 1.012-1.018 3.6-5.0 35-45 8-17
    Brewer’s Friend 70% 1.052 1.015 4.90% 31.33 3.59
    The color was very light, but at 4.9% ABV, not a problem and the next batch will get some darker crystal.
     
  6. GernBlanston

    GernBlanston New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    317
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    None of my business, but if you have the equipment, and its paid for, whats the expense in hanging on to it? Why the need to let it go?
     
  7. lagerz

    lagerz New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2014
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    My last batch I bottled about 48 glass beer bottles and 1 x 1 Liter cleaned plastic soda bottle as a test. A month after bottling the plastic soda bottle tasted the same as a glass bottle and had good carbonation.

    I actually didn't think it would work because if you twist open a soda and then reclose it, even tightly, all the carbonation seems to escape in less than 72 hours.
     
  8. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,693
    Likes Received:
    7,192
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    As far as simply working, there shouldn't be a problem. Soda is generally more pressurized than beer. Get some new plastic caps from the homebrew shop and you should be fine there. The only concern, if you're using the most common clear soda bottles, is skunking if they're exposed to sunlight. Keep them in a dark place.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white