Toasted Flaked Wheat in an IPA?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by jmcnamara, Dec 11, 2015.

  1. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rosedale, MD
    So, I've got about 3-4 lbs of flaked wheat laying around and some columbus and amarillo hops. I'd really like to clear these out of my inventory since I've had them for awhile.
    Since I haven't brewed an IPA in a bit, I thought of maybe brewing that. I'd also like to try toasting the wheat first.
    Yet a further, self-imposed constraint is that I'd like to limit the cost of additional ingredients, so I'm looking to keep the grist simple and not have any additional hops.

    does a toasted wheat citrus IPA sound good? or should I leave the wheat for another batch?
    any thoughts?

    as always, much obliged everyone
     
  2. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2012
    Messages:
    2,254
    Likes Received:
    2,455
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Back in the mountains
    I recently did a 50-50 wheat/Belgian pils with lots of homegrown centennial for bittering and cascade for aroma(called it a white belgian IPA). It was tasty with trappist high grav yeast. The toasted wheat could work. What other base malts are on hand? 2row mashed 150ish should work ok.
     
  3. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rosedale, MD
    Nothing else on hand, but the lhbs is pretty stocked. 2 and 6 row, maris otter, pearl, etc

    Can't recall if I've ever used pils malt yet, so that might be a good option.

    And I haven't even begun to think on the yeast side of things
     
  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,977
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    be careful toasting anything let alone flakes, the manufactures do this for a very long time at low temperatures, we on the other hand get impatient and want it now, then the taste goes to slightly burnt very easy and that flavor takes over the beer
     
  5. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rosedale, MD
    Roger that.
    I was looking around a bit, and I'm thinking of 300 degrees and check it every 15-20 mins and move them around as needed.
    I do have a bit of it on hand, so I could always do a little at a time to get a feel for it
     
  6. EbonHawk

    EbonHawk New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2015
    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Oh yeah, experimentation is the spice of brewing... Let 'er rip, and let us know how it turns out. Sounds like something I would try. I purposefully never brew the exact same recipe. I feel like, even if I do revisit an old recipe, I'm still gonna change something about it. Brewing the same stuff over and over just feels like defeating the whole purpose of homebrewing.

    I used to think I wanted to work in a brewery. I have volunteered at a local brewery for a couple of years now, and I have to say, I would find it utterly boring, brewing the same recipes from a set of sheets, measuring the same grains out, day after day, throwing in the same old hops. Glad I'm just volunteering. :)
     
  7. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2015
    Messages:
    3,240
    Likes Received:
    1,557
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I'm going the other way. I've brewed quite heavily since January, mostly different brews. There's one or two recipes I've brewed more than once since then. I've decided I'm going to cut it down to about 3 or 4 different recipes that I'll mostly brew. Those recipes will not change. I figure that since I tended to buy only one beer to drink (Yuengling), there's nothing wrong with brewing a limited number of recipes. I figure I'll find something I really like, and always have it on hand.
     
  8. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    961
    Likes Received:
    578
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Mentor, Ohio
    That may be a bit high. I toast 2 row whole @ 275° for a total of 30 minutes, stirring half way through and get a nice toasted character from that.
    The flaked products will toast up quicker and be more susceptible to getting over done.
    You're the chef and it's your kitchen so go for it.
    I'm sure you'll make beer! :mrgreen:
    Brian
     
  9. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rosedale, MD
    My oven must be a little weak then. After about 30 mins at 275, they weren't quite where I wanted them, so I bumped it up to 300 for another 10. I stirred everything around every 10 mins

    Theyre a bit browner now, but nothing burnt.

    Tasting side by side, the untoasted reminds me of breakfast yogurt. The toasted makes me think of a nutty pie crust

    2nd batch is in now!
     
  10. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rosedale, MD
  11. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,977
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    the only thing thats odd to me is so much red x, its the same as munich or aromatic malt in flavors so its interesting for sure, not sure what the hops will do for this its going to be a strong flavored beer, good thing the wheat is there to take the flavor another direction
     
  12. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rosedale, MD
    Fair enough. I was building the recipe, and adjusting the style to fit what I was doing, and a red ipa was pretty close. I've never usedone that malt before, so I figured what the heck
    I can definitely rein the hops back, I'm just trying to get rid of what I have.

    These new styles are pretty weird to go through.

    Nothings bought yet, so any ideas are welcome
     
  13. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,415
    Likes Received:
    6,660
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    Ditto. I used to be in the "try everything" camp. Now I'm zeroing in on a few recipes I really like and brewing them more frequently. There's still room for experimentation - I actually like the idea of toasted wheat IPA - but the fridge and shelves will be, more and more, stocked with those beers I really like. Now, since Doc tells me Nosybear is a little to close to hibernation weight than fighting weight, I'll be looking for some good low-alcohol beer recipes....
     
  14. GernBlanston

    GernBlanston New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    317
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Don't worry, I'll wake you up in the spring.
     
  15. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,415
    Likes Received:
    6,660
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    That, sir, would scare the hell out of me.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white