Temperature of boil

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Bierman707, Sep 13, 2018.

  1. Bierman707

    Bierman707 Member

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    Okay, I have all my ingredients. Now I have one final question before brew day.
    How do I determine how high of heat to keep my wort? I know to bring it to a boil (of course) but then I see they keep a steady temp around 150°+/-. I'm not sure if that is celcius or Fahrenheit...
    Can I get some feed back? I know what my temp for fermintation is. I just talking about the cooking temp of the wort.
    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    A boil is roughly 100C or 212F, 150(F) is generally considered the mash temperature. (altitude, a few other things affect it but it's roughly those numbers)

    The boil isn't going to get hotter in a meaningful way, what will happen is the more heat you throw at it the harder it will boil and the more you will boil off (evaporation losses). A mild roiling boil is probably fine.

    Take a listen to podcast episode 52 about boil vigour. http://brulosophy.com/podcast/ It's a good listen.
     
  3. Bierman707

    Bierman707 Member

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    This is great information. So I'm wanting the mash temp. I'll check the podcast right now!
     
  4. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    It's a good listen, their stuff by and large has been hugely helpful to me. Mostly in a calming me down if nothing else approach.

    I think most people aim for the 152-154F range for their mash temperature, I'm working primarily in Centigrade so I have to do different calculations.
     
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  5. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    You can break a lot of laws, just not the laws of physics. The temperature of the boil will be 212F/100C. Water boils at 212F/100C, as you continue to add heat the water that rises above 212F/100C turns into vapor. Not sure if this is part of your question, hope it helps.
     
  6. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

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  7. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Arrrrrrr
     
  8. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

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    But for OP and mash temp it will depend on recipe, some of us have too much spare time so can stretch a brewday out to 8 hours with complex mashing techniques .
    Last brewday was just a single temp, set and forget jobby at 64.5 ° C for an hour
     
  9. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

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    I don't arrrrg strangers on the interweb
     
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  10. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Amen to that!
     
  11. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Yup. Edmonton has a boiling point of 97.8C based on altitude above sea level and if you watch a gauge while boiling you'll notice it doesn't likely hit 100C.
     
  12. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    OP seems to be confusing boiling and mashing. I'd advise finding and reading a basic how-to-brew text for understanding the entire brewing process step by step and to clear up some misconceptions.
     
  13. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, that's why I clarified the ranges right off the bat. They're different enough that it should be straight forward to find out which he's talking about.

    Bierman, I didn't see a recipe posted, can you link what you're planning to brew? That will help us clear things up for you too.
     
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  14. Bierman707

    Bierman707 Member

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    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/704491/hansberger
    That is the link. I haven't completed it yet. I need to add my ferulic acid rest at 110°F for 20 minutes. But this is it, more or less. Any advice on the recipe?
     
  15. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I have no idea what the rest you're talking about is but it's a pretty straight forward recipe. You don't need to mash DME so a boil can be short unless you're looking for something specific from the hops.
     
  16. White Haus Brews

    White Haus Brews Active Member

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    As Hawkbox mentioned you will not need to hold any temp prior to the boil when using DME. Bring water to boil, turn off heat and stir in DME, resume boil and add hops per your recipe. If all you need is 12 min for hops you can even do a 20-30min boil and save yourself some time.
     
  17. White Haus Brews

    White Haus Brews Active Member

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    In terms of the recipe itself I'm not sure exactly what you're going for. Is this supposed to be a hoppy wheat IPA?
    If it were me I would probably split the hops and add a small bittering addition at 60 min up to the IBU you're aiming for (to my taste 64 IBU for a 1.050 OG is a bit high and I would shoot for the 40-50 range but to each their own) and use the rest as a dry hop (or flameout at the very least). That should pack more of a flavor/aroma punch while keeping the bitterness the same. That's also supposed to be a pretty expressive, estery yeast. Not sure how that will play with the flavor of the hops but it could end up a little muddled or off tasting. That said if it's based on a recipe/source you trust maybe it's amazing. Curious to hear how it turns out!
     
  18. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Bierman, I really, really, really mean no offense but it's painfully obvious that you're very confused about the whole process. I suppose you're surfing the internet and getting all sorts of ideas about how beer is made but this shows that you really haven't figured out the most basic processes involved.
    I don't know where you got the notion that you were going to do a ferulic rest, or any rest for that matter. There's nothing in your recipe to rest at any temperature. You're not mashing...you're not even steeping specialty malt. You're doing a straight-forward extract-only beer. You get a bunch of water, stir in the extract, boil it for a while and throw in some hops and boil it for a little longer. That's it.
    As for the recipe, it'll work but it won't give you the hefeweizen you're expecting. You've got a full-on White IPA going on here. As I mentioned in another post, Centennial is a hop that's very different from what's associated with the sort of beer flavor that you're targeting. And 64 IBUs is off-the-charts high for a Weissbier. Something like 15 IBUs is on the high end.
    I'm sure you'll figure it out but I really hope that you'll do yourself a favor and nail down some basics before you venture too far.
    Best of luck. ;)
     
  19. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Yeah dude, you do seem to be making this way more complicated than it needs to be.

    I made some extract beers when I first started and they were a 20 minute job and the biggest problem was cooling it at the end. Maybe take a read through the instruction set the place i got my kit from posts, it might help as you are basically doing a partial mash without the mash, so it's even easier.

    http://hopdawgs.ca/Resources/Dry-Malt-Extract
     
  20. Texas Ale Works

    Texas Ale Works Active Member

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    @beirman707

    Maybe take a few minutes to walk us your thoughts on your brew day. That way we can get an idea of what you think the process should be. From there we can help where needed, and help nail down your direction.

    If you are all over the internet building your ideas on how to brew, I would humbly suggest that you slow down and let us help you.

    T
     
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