Temp change at end of fementation

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Sanktwo, Jan 26, 2019.

  1. Sanktwo

    Sanktwo New Member

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    I store my fermenter in the basement for fermentation and that is usually around 62-64F (at this time of yr) then usually a day or two before I bottling I bring up to the main floor which is more around 68-70F. I do this to let things settle back to the bottom if things got mixed during the move.

    for this brew:
    Around week 2.5 fermentation has slowed and temp dropped to around 62F and has been stable for about 2 more weeks. then I brought it up last night and temp raised to about 66F and plan to bottle tomorrow.

    So here is my newb question:
    is this good or bad?
    Is anything starting back up with the temp rising and possibly activating yeast again and leaving unfished business with the short rise in temp before going into bottles?
    Could this create off flavors?
    Should I just leave in the basement and bottle from that temp and not worry about things getting mixed up when moving the fermenter up on bottling day?
     
  2. thehaze

    thehaze Active Member

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    The bulk of fermentation is where the yeast will produce esters and phenols, when and if the case. This means, the first 2--4 days are crucial for the yeast profile to turn out as expected, and of course avoid off-flavours caused by a high fermentation temperature. After that it's not really that important, as the yeast already " created " the flavours in the beer.

    Fermentation will cause heat, which means if ambient temperature is 64F, then the temperature of the beer inside the fermenter ( if not controlled ) will be with 4-10F higher. Not an issue if the yeast can ferment up in that range.

    Raising the temperature with a few degrees after the first days of fermentation helps the yeast finish fermentation and clean after itself. It's a good practice. Usually 3-5 days would suffice. When you bottle, you need to know the highest temperature your beer reached, in order to properly calculate the amount of priming sugar to use. It doesn't matter which temperature your beer has at the time of bottling. There will always be residual CO2 in the fermenter before bottling and the amount is dictated by the fermentation temperature.
     
  3. Sanktwo

    Sanktwo New Member

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    thanks for the advice

    the temp of the fermenter is around 68F for the past 2 days and the airlock is showing a little activity. the Yeast is Wyeast Whitbread. active from 64-75F if I remember correctly. I will check FG this afternoon and most likely bottle and store in basement 64F
     
  4. thehaze

    thehaze Active Member

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    Don't store the beer lower than 68F because carbonation will take much longer to develop. Yeast works better and faster at higher temperatures. Keep it at 68-70F for 7 days at least and then move it to another location, even a colder one. But, provided your process was OK and everything is fine, your beer will develop carbonation in 4-5 days.
     
  5. Sanktwo

    Sanktwo New Member

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    that's exactly what I did. After the move from basement to main floor, I waited 5 days at 68F before bottling. then I stored the bottles at 68F, It's been almost a week and I want to pop one open so bad and give it a try because during bottling it smelled so good, probably wait for the weekend to give a try :)
     
  6. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    How big was the batch? If you brewed 5 gallons, I would totally pop one in the fridge for a day and then give it a go in the name of science and quality control!
     
  7. thehaze

    thehaze Active Member

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    If you can't wait a day, I usually - successfully - pop a bottle in the freezer, leave it for 20-40 minutes, put in the fridge maybe for 3 hours and try it. But I tried enough just from turbo-chilling in the freezer for 30 minutes. Works great.
     
  8. Sanktwo

    Sanktwo New Member

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    i gave it a try last night (1 week after bottling) and this is a tasty beverage, still not carbed enough though hopefully another week and all will be right
     

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