Tasting off flavors in the finish

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Brewer #248031, Jan 27, 2020.

  1. Brewer #248031

    Brewer #248031 New Member

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    I just kegged a amber ale, and the finish is really bad. It tastes like it's burnt. Now, I'm not the best at describing flavors, so I'm probably not giving the best description. The first part of the taste is fine, and there were no off flavors right before I pitched the yeast.

    The hop bill is pretty light and there was no dry hopping. I'm thinking O2 is the culprit and I'm wondering how long it would take those off flavors to materialize. I did transfer to a second fermenter prior to kegging then cold crashed two days later. My auto siphon was sucking up a lot of air during transfers. Thanks why I think the problem is O2.
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps eliminating the obvious, but you didn't burn or scorch the wort, did you? Or use a large amount of roasted malt? Posting the recipe and brewing method used would be helpful.
     
  3. Mase

    Mase Well-Known Member

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    And unless you are really attached to the notion... you can skip secondary in a second vessel. Primary and secondary can be done in the same vessel.
     
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  4. Group W

    Group W Well-Known Member

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  5. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Post your recipe...Most Amber Ales use too much roasted malt for color. You wouldn't have noticed in the sweet wort if there was a touch of ash-tray/burnt toast flavor but in the finished beer you might, especially if you've attenuated to a high percentage.

    Another slight possibility is light-struck beer. It's not common in darker beers but if your fermenter was exposed to sunlight, you could get that skunky off flavor. It has to be really sever to go to the burnt-rubber phase but I suppose it's possible.

    I've also had some nasty reactions to certain vinyl tubing I've used. Great tasting beer comes out tasting light-struck and skunky/burnt chemical when it's exposed for any length of time.
     
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  6. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    A little more info as stated above will help us narrow things down.
    As for me obvious question is how do you fire your kettle gas/electric but if you were burn fee pre pitch that rules the scortch effect out.

    This hasn't happened before by chance? That would highlight JAs example of vinyl tubeing.but reckon he's onto something with using roasted barley in the grist especially if the Bicarbonates ain't there in the water to round them out?

    Recipie pls:)
     

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